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Stan Lee has lost his mind


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#1 Guest_snookie_wookums_*

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 02:24 PM

Stan Lee, creator of many of the great comic book characters that I grew up reading, has finally gone completely off the reservation.

http://www.thescotti...icle2128530.ece

Beside the fact that the "world's first homo hero" was actually unveiled 17 years ago in the pages of Alpha Flight #106, there's been homo-eroticism in comic books going back to the dawn of comic book heroes (ehh, Batman and Robin, anyone?). Somebody please take Stan Lee out back and "Old Yeller" him before he completely destroys all my fond memories of his good work from 40 years ago.

#2 Predator Ranger

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 03:14 PM

Apparently Northstar doesn't count. Then again, Canadians rarely count for anything anyway.
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#3 nevposey

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 03:19 PM

"TV execs hope it will rival the huge success of shows likes Heroes."

I'm sure George Takei is torn between the two.

#4 camoor

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 03:22 PM

Dumb.

I thought XMen 2 was pretty great, specifically that scene when Iceman tells his parents he's a mutant. In the world of sci-fi, subtlety works better.

#5 Quillion

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 04:01 PM

Stan Lee, creator of many of the great comic book characters that I grew up reading, has finally gone completely off the reservation.

http://www.thescotti...icle2128530.ece

Beside the fact that the "world's first homo hero" was actually unveiled 17 years ago in the pages of Alpha Flight #106, there's been homo-eroticism in comic books going back to the dawn of comic book heroes (ehh, Batman and Robin, anyone?). Somebody please take Stan Lee out back and "Old Yeller" him before he completely destroys all my fond memories of his good work from 40 years ago.

Of course he is. The man cowrote the "Stripper Superhero" with Pam Anderson.

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#6 rabbitt

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 04:02 PM

I take this as him coming out of the closet.

#7 Javery

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 04:04 PM

He's 86 - of course he's out of his mind!

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#8 KaneRobot

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 04:09 PM

All the signs were there, you know...this was from back in 2000:

http://www.ew.com/ew...,,85031,00.html
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#9 epobirs

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 04:15 PM

Stan Lee lost his mind a very long time ago. Then he went into comics and found it was a professional asset. He then made a career of shoplifting ideas and hiding the theft behind his towering ego.
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#10 JolietJake

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 04:51 PM

He just profits from his fame at this point. People hear the name Stan Lee and automatically want to know what he's doing.

Edited by JolietJake, 14 January 2009 - 05:12 PM.

I enjoy the videos and puns posted by Joliet Jake. I think he's almost as funny as my favorite comedian, Dane Cook. Now excuse me while I listen to Fallout Boy's music on their myspace page.


#11 neocisco

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 04:58 PM

Stan Lee lost his mind a very long time ago. Then he went into comics and found it was a professional asset. He then made a career of shoplifting ideas and hiding the theft behind his towering ego.


Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko concur.

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#12 Gentlegamer

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 07:13 PM

X-Men (and all mutants) are already teh ghey.
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#13 Liquid 2

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 07:53 PM

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:rofl:

#14 emdub

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 08:58 PM

Oh...the Sun. Of course. Remember when they reported that Eddie Murphy was going to be the Riddler in the next Batman? They totally nailed that one.
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#15 Chase

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 10:26 PM

Perhaps the Sun is reporting old news? The last time I remember the news covering the unveiling of a gay superhero was many years ago when Marvel debuted the Rawhide Kid.

#16 Guest_snookie_wookums_*

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Posted 14 January 2009 - 11:00 PM

Perhaps the Sun is reporting old news? The last time I remember the news covering the unveiling of a gay superhero was many years ago when Marvel debuted the Rawhide Kid.


Truth is, the more modern concept of a "Gay Hero" started with John Byrne's Alpha Flight, where he played around with the idea that the member of the team named Northstar was gay, but in the 80's it was still too controversial to put it out there explicitly, so he *implied* that Northstar was gay, and left it at that.

Then, years later Marvel had much less readership overall, and had Northstar come out of the closet explicitly in order to make headlines, which worked, and artificially boosted readership of their flagging comic book series (Alpha Flight), but ultimately this turned into yet another publicity stunt.

The reality in the aftermath of Northstar coming out was essentially unchanged; his character never had a boyfriend in the pages of the comic, and there was some occasional allusion to his sexual orientation, but the character was unchanged from the narcissistic a-hole he was created to be (hmm... stereotyping?).

So in fact, The Rawhide Kid came out nearly 20 years after Northstar was created by John Byrne, and his coming out was entirely a publicity stunt to appeal to the perceived growing gay audience of Marvel's demographic.

#17 crunchb3rry

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 12:17 AM

Stan Lee is a douchebag, going back far before this particular event.

#18 Chase

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 12:44 AM

Truth is, the more modern concept of a "Gay Hero" started with John Byrne's Alpha Flight, where he played around with the idea that the member of the team named Northstar was gay, but in the 80's it was still too controversial to put it out there explicitly, so he *implied* that Northstar was gay, and left it at that.

Then, years later Marvel had much less readership overall, and had Northstar come out of the closet explicitly in order to make headlines, which worked, and artificially boosted readership of their flagging comic book series (Alpha Flight), but ultimately this turned into yet another publicity stunt.

The reality in the aftermath of Northstar coming out was essentially unchanged; his character never had a boyfriend in the pages of the comic, and there was some occasional allusion to his sexual orientation, but the character was unchanged from the narcissistic a-hole he was created to be (hmm... stereotyping?).

So in fact, The Rawhide Kid came out nearly 20 years after Northstar was created by John Byrne, and his coming out was entirely a publicity stunt to appeal to the perceived growing gay audience of Marvel's demographic.



Yes, I know Northstar. I was just referring to the last, recent time I read about 'gay superhero' in the news. ;) Good post, though. :)

#19 mxyzplik

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 12:44 AM

Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko concur.


I love Stan "the Man" Lee, but yeah, he's an attention grabbing idea thief. Fun to read and listen to though.

#20 zionoverfire

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 02:29 AM

unless of course he's going to make an already well know superhero gay.

#21 neocisco

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 02:54 AM

He's not, at least not at Marvel. He doesn't work for them anymore.

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#22 The Crotch

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 03:26 AM

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#23 kube00

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 03:43 AM

super dickery anyone?

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#24 The Crotch

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 03:50 AM

Damn straight.

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#25 DarkNessBear

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 04:28 AM

Might make a funny comedy. Is it a comedy?
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#26 epobirs

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 07:13 AM

Jack Kirby and Steve Ditko concur.


I don't mean stealing from the colleagues he worked alongside with in comics. There was that but there was other things of a more blatant nature that some of those colleagues were party to.

Consider the original Hulk origin story, which appeared in May, 1962. Then watch the 1957 film 'The Amazing Colossal Man' and its 1958 sequel 'War of the Colossal Beast.' These played very widely for years before the Hulk was created and the bomb test sequence that sets the plot in motion is more than a little familiar to Hulk fans.

Just about all of the major Stan Lee creations were derived from well worn SF themes. People going into space and coming back strangely changed. Mutants or evolutionary advancements to the human species.

Daredevil wasn't the first blind superhero. Dr. Midnite had been around over twenty years earlier.

Did Lee's work help advance the state of comics writing? Sure but this was because things were so incredibly abysmal in the wake of the Code eliminating most material of interest to adult and those who wanted to write for an older audience. The Baby Boomers, the most self-indulgent generation known to human history, kept reading comics at an age well past where the previous generation moved on to other things. These are the people who made Stan Lee a success. It still took decades before most comics writing wasn't laughably bad.

There are several DVD collections of major Marvel series, like the first 40 years of Spider-man. Trying to read this all the way through can be a painful slog depending on when your comics experience began. Mine starts in the mid-70s and most of those books are horrible today, yet are leaps and bounds better than the stuff from the 60s.

What is interesting to me is how much better the medium has become, not just for new talents but also for longtime contributors who were constrained from proper storytelling. For example, Doug Moench has done some great stuff but try to read the original Deathlok series from the 70s. It's so disjointed that it is frequently difficult to tell why anything is happening or if we are supposed to recognize the world where this is taking place. Is it the future and if so, how far into the future? Moench had a distinctive concept that was pretty good for the era but little idea how to tell the story. It was the kind of stuff in the prose world that would never make it out of creative writing class, nevermind be submitted to a publisher. Moench tread a lot of the same ground many years later for a DC series called Electric Warrior that was a night and day difference in setting up a world and telling a story that had the reader wanting to know more rather just saying WTF?
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#27 DarkKenpachi

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Posted 15 January 2009 - 04:10 PM

Dumb.

I thought XMen 2 was pretty great, specifically that scene when Iceman tells his parents he's a mutant. In the world of sci-fi, subtlety works better.



you know I went to Wizard World 2006 and sat in on the Kevin Smith panel on that Saturday night and he actually made a very valid point about how the Xmen movies could be taken in a homosexual light. something I never thought of before but actually a very interesting conversation to hear.

Of course he is. The man cowrote the "Stripper Superhero" with Pam Anderson.

Erotica Jones

There wasn't any doubt then that he had lost it.


Was I the only person who liked stripperella? It was so bad it was good. Though the dvd set is one of the few dvds that my wife actually says that I CAN NOT BUY. not because of the content just because how bad she thought the show was. lol

anyway Stan is still the man in my opinion, crazy yes but still the man. and honestly he is just whoring himself out to keep the money coming in. I mean look at the show Who wants to be a Superhero? lol
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#28 snookie_wookums

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Posted 16 January 2009 - 01:53 AM

I don't mean stealing from the colleagues he worked alongside with in comics. There was that but there was other things of a more blatant nature that some of those colleagues were party to.

Consider the original Hulk origin story, which appeared in May, 1962. Then watch the 1957 film 'The Amazing Colossal Man' and its 1958 sequel 'War of the Colossal Beast.' These played very widely for years before the Hulk was created and the bomb test sequence that sets the plot in motion is more than a little familiar to Hulk fans.

Just about all of the major Stan Lee creations were derived from well worn SF themes. People going into space and coming back strangely changed. Mutants or evolutionary advancements to the human species.

Daredevil wasn't the first blind superhero. Dr. Midnite had been around over twenty years earlier.

Did Lee's work help advance the state of comics writing? Sure but this was because things were so incredibly abysmal in the wake of the Code eliminating most material of interest to adult and those who wanted to write for an older audience. The Baby Boomers, the most self-indulgent generation known to human history, kept reading comics at an age well past where the previous generation moved on to other things. These are the people who made Stan Lee a success. It still took decades before most comics writing wasn't laughably bad.

There are several DVD collections of major Marvel series, like the first 40 years of Spider-man. Trying to read this all the way through can be a painful slog depending on when your comics experience began. Mine starts in the mid-70s and most of those books are horrible today, yet are leaps and bounds better than the stuff from the 60s.

What is interesting to me is how much better the medium has become, not just for new talents but also for longtime contributors who were constrained from proper storytelling. For example, Doug Moench has done some great stuff but try to read the original Deathlok series from the 70s. It's so disjointed that it is frequently difficult to tell why anything is happening or if we are supposed to recognize the world where this is taking place. Is it the future and if so, how far into the future? Moench had a distinctive concept that was pretty good for the era but little idea how to tell the story. It was the kind of stuff in the prose world that would never make it out of creative writing class, nevermind be submitted to a publisher. Moench tread a lot of the same ground many years later for a DC series called Electric Warrior that was a night and day difference in setting up a world and telling a story that had the reader wanting to know more rather just saying WTF?


Awesome post! I just knew there were some comic geeks on this site who could equal or better my nerdiness when it comes to the historical context of comics, the creators, and the paranoid societal forces around such inventions as the Comics Code Authority. The ultimate irony being that in my opinion, the CCA made the medium better, because when you think about it, creators like Frank Miller, Alan Moore, and Neil Gaiman would never have created the great works they have unless they had the stupid rules of the CCA to work around.

It's limits that define genius, because without them, how would we ever know what can be possible?

Edited by snookie_wookums, 16 January 2009 - 02:05 AM.


#29 JaroldL

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Posted 16 January 2009 - 01:57 AM

tsk tsk, ive always admired this man.

#30 integralsmatic

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Posted 16 January 2009 - 02:08 AM

dont really care. it will be just another book sitting on the shelf with all the others..and will probably die off due to some crazy comic war that will take center stage as usual.
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