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Bypassing PS3's internal Wi-fi


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#1 RCS0926

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 06:44 PM

I think I know the answer to this, but I just wanted some clarification from some knowledgeable CAGs. I'm positive that my PS3, which I've had for 3-4 years, has a faulty internal wireless receiver. Ever since owning it, my PS3's wireless connectivity has been hit or miss. I always assumed that this was because of PSN's inferior quality in comparison to the 360/Live. However, I've recently come to realize that my network issues aren't a common problem among the majority of PS3 owners.

I'm very intrigued by PS+ because it appears to be a great value. However, I've been hesitant to pull the trigger on an annual sub because of my PS3's network issues. I know my router isn't the issue because I generally have no Wi-fi issues with my 360, Wii, laptop and smartphone. At any rate, before I take the plunge with PS+, I want to make sure my PS3's connectivity is up to snuff, and I believe I have to bypass my PS3's internal receiver. I can think of 3 ways to do this:

1. Connect my PS3 directly to my modem via ethernet cable. This isn't an option since my cable modem is all the way on the other side of the house, and I don't feel like going through the hassle of putting holes in my house to run an ethernet cable to my PS3.

2. Use powerline adapters to establish an ethernet connection to my PS3. I was seriously considering this, but I have no way of knowing if the plugs I will use for the powerline adapters will be on the same circuit. Plus, this seems like a pretty expensive option given the fact that I'll have to invest in a powerline adapter kit, at least one ethernet switch (2 if I want the option of wiring my other consoles) and extra ethernet cables. I'd be fine with doing all this if I knew my plugs were on the same circuit, but the lack of certainty makes me hesitate to go with this option.

3. The final option is the one I'm probably going with, and it involves getting a wireless ethernet adapter. As I understand it, this will make my PS3 think it's connected via a wired connection, which would obviously bypass the internal Wi-fi. However, in reality, the ethernet adapter would be sending out it's own wireless signal to my router. In theory, the ethernet adapter would produce a stronger connection for my PS3 than the internal receiver.

At any rate, I apologize for the wall of text, but I just need confirmation on what I posted. In particular, I'd like to know if my understanding of #3 is correct and if this is my best option given my reservations regarding the first 2 options. Thanks in advance.:)

#2 ToddManG

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 08:07 PM

If the problem is indeed with your internal wifi then #3 should do the trick..I've got an OG xbox wireless adapter that I've been using for years with my 360 (pre wifi model) without any problem. Once it's configured you can plug in any wired ethernet device and put it on your network.

#3 RCS0926

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 08:27 PM

Thanks for the confirmation. I appreciate it.

#4 Blaster man

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 10:50 PM

I think that you should go with the powerline adapter. They've gotten cheap compared to a couple years ago.

#5 RCS0926

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Posted 21 December 2012 - 10:54 PM

I think that you should go with the powerline adapter. They've gotten cheap compared to a couple years ago.


I know they aren't expensive. I found a well-reviewed kit on Newegg for $30. However, my biggest concern is that the outlets that the powerline adapters will be plugged into won't be on the same circuit. If that's the case, then I will have wasted my money. In all likelihood, that probably won't be an issue, but I'd like to take the less risky and expensive option for now.

#6 htz

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Posted 22 December 2012 - 06:01 PM

I know they aren't expensive. I found a well-reviewed kit on Newegg for $30. However, my biggest concern is that the outlets that the powerline adapters will be plugged into won't be on the same circuit. If that's the case, then I will have wasted my money. In all likelihood, that probably won't be an issue, but I'd like to take the less risky and expensive option for now.

You could always return it if it doesn't work...

#7 evilw0n

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 04:51 AM

I know they aren't expensive. I found a well-reviewed kit on Newegg for $30. However, my biggest concern is that the outlets that the powerline adapters will be plugged into won't be on the same circuit. If that's the case, then I will have wasted my money. In all likelihood, that probably won't be an issue, but I'd like to take the less risky and expensive option for now.


Are you saying on the same leg back to the main? That's a bunch of crap. I used one over 10 years ago without an issue and I can guarantee that the two outlets were not on the same leg back to the main. As a matter of fact, different floors on completely opposite ends of the house.

While it is not asked for I will add that wireless sucks. If you want anything guaranteed get it wired. Wireless is merely for convenience and nothing else. I do use it but not for anything I depend upon having any major performance on. I will stop there or I will get into my 100 ways wireless is horrible compared to a wired network.

I'd get the powerline if that is your best option. It will work as long as they all run into your main. They would have a LOT of issues if that is not the case. Now, if you are talking two independent circuits (you have two+ mains) then that is another story.

#8 Vinny

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 04:55 AM

3. The final option is the one I'm probably going with, and it involves getting a wireless ethernet adapter. As I understand it, this will make my PS3 think it's connected via a wired connection, which would obviously bypass the internal Wi-fi. However, in reality, the ethernet adapter would be sending out it's own wireless signal to my router. In theory, the ethernet adapter would produce a stronger connection for my PS3 than the internal receiver.



Wait... you can do this? I was under the impression that the PS3 wouldn't recognize USB adapters.

Hell, if this is true, I gonna get an N adapter ASAP.

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#9 Mad39er

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Posted 23 December 2012 - 03:33 PM

If you're going to be dedicating yourself to a wireless set up you might as well put a wireless access point and run ethernet from the PS3 to that. This way you don't have the PS3 wireless protocols getting in the way or worrying that the USB port is faulty when it does act up(one of mine currently does).

I just want to echo jmbreci and say that the PS3 network protocols suck terribly as is, you really should run a wired connection to it. It's more than a night and day difference.
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#10 RCS0926

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 04:35 PM

If you're going to be dedicating yourself to a wireless set up you might as well put a wireless access point and run ethernet from the PS3 to that. This way you don't have the PS3 wireless protocols getting in the way or worrying that the USB port is faulty when it does act up(one of mine currently does).

I just want to echo jmbreci and say that the PS3 network protocols suck terribly as is, you really should run a wired connection to it. It's more than a night and day difference.


I'll opt for a wired connection if my current solution doesn't work. I may be mistaken, but I believe what I'm attempting to do with the ethernet adapter
jives with what you described in your first paragraph. The ethernet adapter will plug into the PS3's ethernet port and make the PS3 think it's plugged into a wired connection. However, the ethernet adapter will be acting as the wireless receiver thus bypassing the PS3's network protocol, correct? At any rate, I'm getting the ethernet adapter today and will be able to test it out tonight.

#11 RCS0926

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 04:38 PM

Wait... you can do this? I was under the impression that the PS3 wouldn't recognize USB adapters.

Hell, if this is true, I gonna get an N adapter ASAP.


It's not a USB adapter. It's an ethernet adapter. The adapter plugs into the PS3's ethernet port and makes the PS3 think it's using a wired connection, which bypasses the PS3's wireless receiver. However, the internet connection to the PS3 is still wireless. The big difference is that the ethernet adapter acts as the wireless receiver instead, and you can get wireless N speed as opposed to the PS3's G speed.

#12 RCS0926

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 04:41 PM

Are you saying on the same leg back to the main? That's a bunch of crap. I used one over 10 years ago without an issue and I can guarantee that the two outlets were not on the same leg back to the main. As a matter of fact, different floors on completely opposite ends of the house.

While it is not asked for I will add that wireless sucks. If you want anything guaranteed get it wired. Wireless is merely for convenience and nothing else. I do use it but not for anything I depend upon having any major performance on. I will stop there or I will get into my 100 ways wireless is horrible compared to a wired network.

I'd get the powerline if that is your best option. It will work as long as they all run into your main. They would have a LOT of issues if that is not the case. Now, if you are talking two independent circuits (you have two+ mains) then that is another story.


Thanks for the input. I appreciate it.

#13 Blaster man

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 04:44 PM

I know they aren't expensive. I found a well-reviewed kit on Newegg for $30. However, my biggest concern is that the outlets that the powerline adapters will be plugged into won't be on the same circuit. If that's the case, then I will have wasted my money. In all likelihood, that probably won't be an issue, but I'd like to take the less risky and expensive option for now.


Can't you just go to your breaker box and find out?

#14 RCS0926

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 04:48 PM

Can't you just go to your breaker box and find out?


I'm not even sure what I would be looking for. Still, if I really wanted to know, I know I could Google it and find out. I guess in the end, I was just looking for the cheapest solution available. I was able to get an ethernet adapter for $25. A decent powerline kit would've cost at least $30, and I would've had to drop another $10 or so on an ethernet switch. In the end, we'll see whether or not I made the right decision.

#15 ShayTheRogue

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 05:21 PM

Is your PS3 anywhere near your PC? If so you could bridge the connection if your PC is connected via wifi. That's what I do with my old, white Xbox 360. This solution would be free.

#16 RCS0926

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 05:38 PM

Is your PS3 anywhere near your PC? If so you could bridge the connection if your PC is connected via wifi. That's what I do with my old, white Xbox 360. This solution would be free.


Unfortunately, my PS3 and Mac are located on opposite sides of the house. I don't think that would be a viable solution. I'm pretty hopeful that this new ethernet adapter I purchased will work out. As I mentioned in my original post, I have a 360 as well and don't have any issues with streaming videos or downloading games. If I can bypass the PS3's wifi receiver using the ethernet adapter, then I can think about getting a PS+ membership. Right now, my PS3 isn't reliable when it comes to signing in to PSN or downloading content at a reasonable rate.

I don't game online that much, so what I'm really looking for is a way to download free PS+ content reliably. There are too many times when my PS3 starts downloading content at a fairly fast rate and then just comes to a halt. Sometimes a connection error interrupts the process as the content is being downloaded. This is the kind of stuff that I'm trying to fix with this ethernet adapter. If all else fails, I will shell out for a powerline adapter kit.

#17 shrike4242

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 08:58 PM

A few things to to offer up in some advice:

* How fast is your home Internet connection? That's always going to be the limiting factor in how fast you'd need your connection to the PS3 to be.
* Powerline is a funny animal and it can work great for one person and like crap for another. It can vary from brand to brand in how well it can work as well. I've tried multiple brands and had bad luck with most of them. How old your house wiring is will directly affect it.
* What router do you have? That'll also affect what you have for options on a wireless bridge and how fast that can go.

I have a 450MB wireless bridge connecting all the items on my entertainment center, which includes a PS3 and other consoles. The PS3 is wired into an Ethernet switch and then up to the bridge. With the router a room away, it's pulling 200Mbps of bandwidth in both directions, well in excess of the 30Mbps of my Internet connection.

#18 RCS0926

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 09:07 PM

A few things to to offer up in some advice:

* How fast is your home Internet connection? That's always going to be the limiting factor in how fast you'd need your connection to the PS3 to be.
* Powerline is a funny animal and it can work great for one person and like crap for another. It can vary from brand to brand in how well it can work as well. I've tried multiple brands and had bad luck with most of them. How old your house wiring is will directly affect it.
* What router do you have? That'll also affect what you have for options on a wireless bridge and how fast that can go.

I have a 450MB wireless bridge connecting all the items on my entertainment center, which includes a PS3 and other consoles. The PS3 is wired into an Ethernet switch and then up to the bridge. With the router a room away, it's pulling 200Mbps of bandwidth in both directions, well in excess of the 30Mbps of my Internet connection.


- My home internet connection goes up to 15Mbps.

- I have a Linksys WRT54GL. At some point, I'm going to upgrade to an N router to at least improve the range of my router, which is located as far away from my PS3 as possible. However, like I said before, I have no connection issues at all with my other wireless devices. My PS3 is the only device that has issues connecting wirelessly.

- I ordered an Iogear wireless bridge (150Mbps) from Newegg a couple of days and got it today. I plan on hooking it up tonight, so I'll let everyone know how that goes. It's good to know that I can use an ethernet switch to connect other devices to this bridge if needed. Thanks for mentioning that.

#19 RCS0926

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 09:44 PM

I have another related question. My wireless bridge can be connected to an outlet or USB port. I'm pretty sure I know the answer to this question, but does the PS3's usb ports supply power even when the system is off? I believe the answer is no. If that's the case, then this would be an issue with regards to automatic updates via PS+, correct? If that's the case, then I either need to plug the wireless bridge to an outlet or to another device (i.e. cable box) that has a powered USB port available.

#20 RCS0926

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Posted 27 December 2012 - 09:55 PM

One more question: does the Wii or 360 (slim) have any powered USB ports? I'm realizing now that the cord that came with my wireless bridge isn't very long. It might be too short to plug in to a wall outlet. I'm pretty sure my cable box, which is always on, has a USB port, but just in case it doesn't, I'd like to know if my other two systems can be used instead. Thanks again.

Edited by RCS0926, 27 December 2012 - 10:43 PM.


#21 Mad39er

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Posted 28 December 2012 - 01:28 AM

PS3 ports are dead on power down. What you can do is use a square phone charger(female USB) to power it. I have 2 Samsung cube USB chargers, a pass through outlet USB charger and my tablet charger. It's a freebie if you have any spare phone chargers or Nyko PS3 controller charger.
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#22 RCS0926

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 06:11 PM

OK, so I just wanted to provide an update on my situation. I have a wireless bridge attached to my PS3 now, and I'm glad to say that the network connection on my PS3 is finally reliable. I have no trouble connecting to PSN now and don't have any issues with random disconnections. As a result, I finally sprung for a PS+ subscription.

The only issue I have is that the download speed still isn't great even with the wireless bridge. It literally took between 3-4 days to download SSIV: Arcade Edition (18GB). I know that's a huge file, but my PS3 network test were showing download speeds of less than a Mbps. The weird thing though is that running Speedtest.net using my smartphone in the same room showed download speeds of anywhere from 5-15Mbps depending on the time of day. FYI, my wired cable modem provides speeds of up to 30Mbps.

Another weird thing I encountered is the fact that LittleBigPlanet 2 and Quantum Conundrum (combined 6.4GB) both finished downloading within 2-3 hours, which translates to download speeds in excess of 4Mbps. I know 4Mbps isn't blazing fast, but if SSIV:AE had downloaded at that rate, it would've finished in about 10 hours, which is acceptable to me because that's basically just an overnight download. At any rate, I know the PS3 network connection test lowballs download speeds, so I'm hopeful that my wireless connection via the wireless bridge isn't as slow as the PS3 says it is.

There are a couple of things I plan on doing now. I'm definitely going to be upgrading my PS3 HDD to a 1TB HDD. I just have to wait for the right deal. I also plan on upgrading my G router to an N router. However, before I do so, I'm wondering if I should expect an increase in my PS3 download speeds should I decide to upgrade my router. Also, does it matter if I get an N router with speeds of up to 150Mbps vs 300Mbps? Finally, how much should I expect to pay for a solid N router? I know I can get a good router for $50, but I know that there are quite a few sub-$30 N routers out there that have gotten solid reviews. Thanks in advance for your replies.

#23 Crunchewy

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 06:27 PM

The built-in WiFi seems to work fine with our wireless access point (the one that came with our FiOS service). I can't really comment on the download speeds, but it is reliable. I don't believe we've had a disconnect.

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#24 RCS0926

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Posted 02 January 2013 - 06:32 PM

The built-in WiFi seems to work fine with our wireless access point (the one that came with our FiOS service). I can't really comment on the download speeds, but it is reliable. I don't believe we've had a disconnect.


I definitely had problems with the PS3's internal wi-fi. I thought it was all just part of the PS3's inferior network in comparison to the Xbox 360. As a result, I've largely ignored anything network related on the PS3. I'm glad to finally be able to consider digital games as a viable option on my PS3 now.

#25 Mad39er

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 03:34 AM

The only issue I have is that the download speed still isn't great even with the wireless bridge. It literally took between 3-4 days to download SSIV: Arcade Edition (18GB). I know that's a huge file, but my PS3 network test were showing download speeds of less than a Mbps. The weird thing though is that running Speedtest.net using my smartphone in the same room showed download speeds of anywhere from 5-15Mbps depending on the time of day. FYI, my wired cable modem provides speeds of up to 30Mbps.

Another weird thing I encountered is the fact that LittleBigPlanet 2 and Quantum Conundrum (combined 6.4GB) both finished downloading within 2-3 hours, which translates to download speeds in excess of 4Mbps. I know 4Mbps isn't blazing fast, but if SSIV:AE had downloaded at that rate, it would've finished in about 10 hours, which is acceptable to me because that's basically just an overnight download. At any rate, I know the PS3 network connection test lowballs download speeds, so I'm hopeful that my wireless connection via the wireless bridge isn't as slow as the PS3 says it is.

Different content is stored in different areas, I'd say try again or another day for things. For instance I could not download any of the Borderlands DLC one night, it would queue but the download speed would suck. The next day I was able to DL it at full speed. Patches in particular can be a bitch because they're not stored on the same set of servers as the PSN store.

There is no rhyme or reason to how the download speeds go, the only thing you can do to speed them up is to proxy through a computer using privoxy or some other proxy program. It does add extra lag to multiplayer, so be sure to turn it off for multiplayer gaming.
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#26 RCS0926

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Posted 03 January 2013 - 07:50 PM

Different content is stored in different areas, I'd say try again or another day for things. For instance I could not download any of the Borderlands DLC one night, it would queue but the download speed would suck. The next day I was able to DL it at full speed. Patches in particular can be a bitch because they're not stored on the same set of servers as the PSN store.

There is no rhyme or reason to how the download speeds go, the only thing you can do to speed them up is to proxy through a computer using privoxy or some other proxy program. It does add extra lag to multiplayer, so be sure to turn it off for multiplayer gaming.


Thanks for the info.

#27 htz

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 07:33 AM

At any rate, I know the PS3 network connection test lowballs download speeds, so I'm hopeful that my wireless connection via the wireless bridge isn't as slow as the PS3 says it is.

Spoiler

It only lowballs around 3Mb/s compared to my speedtest on speedtest.net. It's reasonable considering the PSN servers I'm connecting to isn't as close to me as the speedtest.net server.

#28 RCS0926

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Posted 04 January 2013 - 04:35 PM

Spoiler

It only lowballs around 3Mb/s compared to my speedtest on speedtest.net. It's reasonable considering the PSN servers I'm connecting to isn't as close to me as the speedtest.net server.


That's not much of a difference for you. However, for me, there is a substantial difference. Every test I've done shows PS3 DL speeds of under 1Mbps whereas Speedtest.net shows speeds from 5-15Mbps. This is where I'm wondering if upgrading to an N router will help. The wireless bridge attached to my PS3 can download at up to 150Mbps.

#29 Mad39er

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 12:55 AM

That's not much of a difference for you. However, for me, there is a substantial difference. Every test I've done shows PS3 DL speeds of under 1Mbps whereas Speedtest.net shows speeds from 5-15Mbps. This is where I'm wondering if upgrading to an N router will help. The wireless bridge attached to my PS3 can download at up to 150Mbps.

If you proxy through a computer, your speeds will be closer to true. It's the PS3 protocols that blow when it comes to networking. There are bottlenecks in their coding that go away when proxied through a regular Windows computer. It makes no sense but it is what it is.

You also have to essentially DMZ the PS3 as port forwarding is simply not enough, it needs to be completely free to send and receive internet traffic.
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#30 RCS0926

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Posted 05 January 2013 - 12:57 AM

If you proxy through a computer, your speeds will be closer to true. It's the PS3 protocols that blow when it comes to networking. There are bottlenecks in their coding that go away when proxied through a regular Windows computer. It makes no sense but it is what it is.

You also have to essentially DMZ the PS3 as port forwarding is simply not enough, it needs to be completely free to send and receive internet traffic.


I have a Mac. Is there a way to proxy using an iMac? Also, I've already DMZ'd my PS3.