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#91 2DMention

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Posted 08 March 2013 - 09:46 PM

I got a Telecom/Networking degree 13 years ago but barely used it since I got out of college. I wasn't ready for a full time job out of college and too immature.

I got a degree in accounting which I've kinda used as a purchaser/warehouse at my last job.

It's been 1.5 years tomorrow since I've been laid off from my last job. I've gotten a few jobs at banks which didn't work out for about a month each, and a seasonal job at sears as a cashier last xmas.

Sometimes I wonder if I will ever find a job. I've been going for inventory/warehouse/retail jobs. About an interview a week, but no luck. There's just too many people looking right now.
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#92 Ag_SurfR

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 12:13 AM

You want the job or you want to be the robot?


i'll take either one at this point. i'm so sick of my life.

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#93 Dokstarr

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:35 AM

It also seems hard finding someone for a position. We've had an evening and night shift Medical Technologist position open at work for about a month now. We've had maybe two interviews for both positions.
We've also had several people cancel their scheduled interviews (for whatever reason) as well.


I will say evening medical technologist was the best 2.5 years of my life. Easy job, very good pay, etc.

I ended up at as a medical technologist for a while after college when the company I had interned, co-op'd, and worked part-time during the school year, was circling the bowl and wouldn't hire me. I graduated with that as a sure thing the fell apart and ended as a Med Tech for a while. Planned on doing it short term but then the engineering offers I was getting were all pretty much less pay or 6 month contracts. I didn't want to leave the sure thing for less money an having a contract (with no benefits) hang over my head.

I did eventually get an engineering job with the pay I thought I deserved, but even with the big bump in pay it is a much more stressful job.

In the long run engineering has huge oppurtunities for advancement when compared to Med Tech, but for someone who wants decent pay without as much stress, I think Med Tech is a pretty good field.

#94 cruzfactor

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 07:59 AM

It's been almost nine months since I've been laid off from my last job as a CSR. It was the most I ever made from a job (a little over $33K+/yr), but I can't seem to find another job that will earn anything close to what I made previously. I currently have an offer for a warehouse position for $9/hr. I'm unsure if I should take it. Since it's a day job, I'm going to have trouble going on interviews when I eventually decide to look for new work. Luckily, I still have some savings; Money hasn't become an issue yet. However, I can't decide. Continue being unemployed/searching for work for almost a year (maybe even more) or take a low paying job?

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#95 kodave

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 08:49 AM

It's been almost nine months since I've been laid off from my last job as a CSR. It was the most I ever made from a job (a little over $33K+/yr), but I can't seem to find another job that will earn anything close to what I made previously. I currently have an offer for a warehouse position for $9/hr. I'm unsure if I should take it. Since it's a day job, I'm going to have trouble going on interviews when I eventually decide to look for new work. Luckily, I still have some savings; Money hasn't become an issue yet. However, I can't decide. Continue being unemployed/searching for work for almost a year (maybe even more) or take a low paying job?


That's always the catch-22. Keep a gap in your resume or fill it with something that's going to be inapplicable to the field you want to be in? Some employers value the fact you went to work - others don't give a shit if you've been flipping burgers or whatever because it doesn't make you more experienced in whatever field they're in.


#96 Malik112099

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:16 PM

Yeah, that's a slippery slope. I've been worried about a 2 month gap in employment. It is all gonna come down to the individual preference of who's hiring.

#97 Confucius

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 02:30 PM

Guys, don't even worry about anything less than a 12 month gap in employment. Everyone knows the economy is tough.

Just be prepared to explain what you did in those intervening months. If you can say something like "I used the time to gain this new skill or got a certificate or took a class," it won't look like you sat on your ass and played video games.

Even better: "I worked (some job that is hard but beneath your level of experience or education) while taking ___ class while actively looking for a job like this, blah blah blah."

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#98 eldergamer

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Posted 09 March 2013 - 04:55 PM

I will say evening medical technologist was the best 2.5 years of my life. Easy job, very good pay, etc.

I ended up at as a medical technologist for a while after college when the company I had interned, co-op'd, and worked part-time during the school year, was circling the bowl and wouldn't hire me. I graduated with that as a sure thing the fell apart and ended as a Med Tech for a while. Planned on doing it short term but then the engineering offers I was getting were all pretty much less pay or 6 month contracts. I didn't want to leave the sure thing for less money an having a contract (with no benefits) hang over my head.

I did eventually get an engineering job with the pay I thought I deserved, but even with the big bump in pay it is a much more stressful job.

In the long run engineering has huge oppurtunities for advancement when compared to Med Tech, but for someone who wants decent pay without as much stress, I think Med Tech is a pretty good field.


And here I thought I was the only one! :D

Working as a med tech is pretty easy, once you're trained and get to know the routine. It's the same thing. You're going to be looking at the same cells or seeing the same results for the rest of your life.

It's only stressfull if you don't know how to multi-task and mange your time well. Unfortunately, I work with people who have been there 30+ years and get totally flustered and panic any time they have to deal with more than three specimens at a time.

There really isn't an room for advancement unless you want to be a supervisor and double check everyone's work.

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#99 62t

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 12:13 AM

It's been almost nine months since I've been laid off from my last job as a CSR. It was the most I ever made from a job (a little over $33K+/yr), but I can't seem to find another job that will earn anything close to what I made previously. I currently have an offer for a warehouse position for $9/hr. I'm unsure if I should take it. Since it's a day job, I'm going to have trouble going on interviews when I eventually decide to look for new work. Luckily, I still have some savings; Money hasn't become an issue yet. However, I can't decide. Continue being unemployed/searching for work for almost a year (maybe even more) or take a low paying job?


Can't you call in sick or something to go to an interview?

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#100 darkcecil32

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 01:03 AM

Just happened on this thread as I am currently employed but rather unhappy with my job situation. Looking through people's struggles, I really feel for everyone going through rough times. I've been trying to gut out my current job until something better comes along, but I've been actively looking for several months with no luck. I've wanted to quit the job I was at after 2 months. I've been there for nearly 10 at this point.

It's been almost nine months since I've been laid off from my last job as a CSR. It was the most I ever made from a job (a little over $33K+/yr), but I can't seem to find another job that will earn anything close to what I made previously. I currently have an offer for a warehouse position for $9/hr. I'm unsure if I should take it. Since it's a day job, I'm going to have trouble going on interviews when I eventually decide to look for new work. Luckily, I still have some savings; Money hasn't become an issue yet. However, I can't decide. Continue being unemployed/searching for work for almost a year (maybe even more) or take a low paying job?


The future is uncertain. I've taken two jobs I've hated and totally out of my field to stave off unemployment as long as possible after initially struggling to find work out of college. My current salary is barely half of what the positions I was grabbing interviews for straight out of college were. You never know when that next interview might or might not come, and not taking a job assuming that something better will come is not a surefire bet. I've had that mindset myself, and for me, it has not panned out thus far.

Guys, don't even worry about anything less than a 12 month gap in employment. Everyone knows the economy is tough.

Just be prepared to explain what you did in those intervening months. If you can say something like "I used the time to gain this new skill or got a certificate or took a class," it won't look like you sat on your ass and played video games.

Even better: "I worked (some job that is hard but beneath your level of experience or education) while taking ___ class while actively looking for a job like this, blah blah blah."


As much as I'd love to agree with this and don't want to come off as a huge pessimist, this varies by industry/company. There are several companies that have unofficial policies that they will only consider candidates who are currently employed. There are a few states that have laws against this and a few more planning legislative action, but it's something that's very hard to prove.

It's great to take classes/certification, especially if unemployed, but you might not have the opportunity to explain that if you're screened out from getting an interview to begin with :cry:.

#101 Confucius

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 02:48 AM

You don't want to work for those companies because those companies are fucking idiots. The right person for a job is the right person for a job.

If someone comes to me highly recommended by someone I know, I don't give a crap if he's been unemployed for awhile.

That being said, now more than ever, its about who you know.

#102 Kendro

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 03:13 AM

That being said, now more than ever, its about who you know.


Agreed. Two colleagues that I used to work with at my last company have contacted me within the past month if I wanted to join them at each of their current companies. Fortunately I am happy where I am right now but it is nice to know I have options.

In addition, I was able to help an ex-colleague secure a position at my current company after he interviewed. My boss asked me how he was, and I said he was very good. I have also forwarded the resume of another ex-colleague to my boss for an opening in another department. He was so enamored with it, he is considering bringing him onto our team.

Don't get me wrong, all of the above is well merited. The individuals that I worked with and have referred are all top notch and skilled which is the reason why I spoke so highly of them. But if you're a valued employee and your boss trusts you, and he's looking at two resumes and one of the people is someone you used to work with and you can give a good referral; they will go with your guy. Networking is key, but you also have to be a valued commodity or no one will refer you.

#103 Confucius

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 03:18 AM

Agreed. Two colleagues that I used to work with at my last company have contacted me within the past month if I wanted to join them at each of their current companies. Fortunately I am happy where I am right now but it is nice to know I have options.

In addition, I was able to help an ex-colleague secure a position at my current company after he interviewed. My boss asked me how he was, and I said he was very good. I have also forwarded the resume of another ex-colleague to my boss for an opening in another department. He was so enamored with it, he is considering bringing him onto our team.

Don't get me wrong, all of the above is well merited. The individuals that I worked with and have referred are all top notch and skilled which is the reason why I spoke so highly of them. But if you're a valued employee and your boss trusts you, and he's looking at two resumes and one of the people is someone you used to work with and you can give a good referral; they will go with your guy. Networking is key, but you also have to be a valued commodity or no one will refer you.


Yeah. You would think that having 100000 candidates would be good for a hiring manager but they don't want to deal with any of that shit. They want a solid recommendation from someone they trust and work with, even if it's peripherally. And I (and most sane professionals) would never recommend someone who I didn't think could do the job because that would make me look like an asshole.

I have never gotten a job cold applying. (edit: besides my first one.)

Even if it's someone someone's former babysitter knows who once had a class with someone, it's better than no relationship whatsoever.

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#104 Malik112099

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 03:30 AM

Can't you call in sick or something to go to an interview?


Most places (that I've worked at or know of) don't offer sick time until at least 3-6 months of work.

#105 darkcecil32

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 03:33 AM

You don't want to work for those companies because those companies are fucking idiots. The right person for a job is the right person for a job.

If someone comes to me highly recommended by someone I know, I don't give a crap if he's been unemployed for awhile.

That being said, now more than ever, its about who you know.


Agreed on the who you know part. I actually read an article recently about one particular Ernst and Young location where a recruiter admitted that they didn't look at any resumes which didn't come from referrals.

Unfortunately for me, my close friends all either went to medical school or became engineers. A lot of them want to help, but I've tapped my network as far as I can, with nothing to show for it. Both jobs I've gotten, I've gotten on my own entirely. That also explains why I've struggled to get a job in my desired industry (finance/accounting).

Meritocracy should be all that matters, but unfortunately these days, it's not. As much as I love the internet, I feel it's almost destroyed the job search process. Before, talking to someone in person would show initiative and moxie. These days, it's just a hindrance met with the generic response of "just apply online."

#106 Confucius

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 03:33 AM

Most places (that I've worked at or know of) don't offer sick time until at least 3-6 months of work.


Yeah but you just don't get paid for that day. But it's worth it to not get paid if you're potentially getting another job. Just don't get fired over doing it.

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I'm 100% shocked that books still exist in today's day and age. I thought they'd be out by now. They make up like 1% of today's entertainment and unless you're 60 or older, stray away from books and start emersing yourself with real entertainment.

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#107 Kendro

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 04:19 AM

Agreed on the who you know part. I actually read an article recently about one particular Ernst and Young location where a recruiter admitted that they didn't look at any resumes which didn't come from referrals.

Unfortunately for me, my close friends all either went to medical school or became engineers. A lot of them want to help, but I've tapped my network as far as I can, with nothing to show for it. Both jobs I've gotten, I've gotten on my own entirely. That also explains why I've struggled to get a job in my desired industry (finance/accounting).

Meritocracy should be all that matters, but unfortunately these days, it's not. As much as I love the internet, I feel it's almost destroyed the job search process. Before, talking to someone in person would show initiative and moxie. These days, it's just a hindrance met with the generic response of "just apply online."


I'm assuming you are trying to get into the Big Four? Sometimes it is easier to get into a financial firm first, and then try to get into the Big Four after a few years of experience under your belt. They typically don't hire non-experienced graduates unless you have a stellar GPA and come from a top school. Ironically, one of the two that I spoke of in my previous post wants me to join his team in the Big Four (we both met and got our start in one of the lower-tier banks).

I would also suggest applying to jobs out of state. The higher profile cities obviously have more openings (NY and Chicago), while you can also apply to less desirable cities where the requirements won't be as strong (San Antonio). Think of it as studying abroad. Just get your few years experience out of state and move back to your home city.

#108 elessar123

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 06:19 AM

I'm assuming you are trying to get into the Big Four? Sometimes it is easier to get into a financial firm first, and then try to get into the Big Four after a few years of experience under your belt. They typically don't hire non-experienced graduates unless you have a stellar GPA and come from a top school. Ironically, one of the two that I spoke of in my previous post wants me to join his team in the Big Four (we both met and got our start in one of the lower-tier banks).


My sister used to work for one of them. Not sure why she left it, actually.

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#109 usickenme

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 04:09 PM

I got the job seeking equivalent of "it's not you, it's me" e-mail.

Thank you for your interest in this opportunity. Based on the information provided, we are pursuing other candidates who more closely match our current requirements and needs.


This was, literally a minute after, I got an email request to complete some pending tasks on their applicant website. Big companies are weird to deal with. When I originally applied for the job, I got the same message as above about 30 min. before I got the call to interview in the first place.

First time I've ever got shot down (job-wise) on a Saturday night.

I was unsure about the position in the first place. 25-50% travel isn't the best when You have a family at home.

#110 Malik112099

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 05:06 PM

I get those "impressive qualifications but we went with someone that more closely matches our needs but we'll keep your resume on file aka some guy's buddy got the job" emails all the time. :-/

#111 kodave

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 06:00 PM

You guy are lucky - most employers don't bother to send rejection emails at all. At least you know for sure what the outcome is.


#112 Dokstarr

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 07:47 PM

It's only stressfull if you don't know how to multi-task and mange your time well. Unfortunately, I work with people who have been there 30+ years and get totally flustered and panic any time they have to deal with more than three specimens at a time.


That is so true. 90% of the people were just like that. God forbid something goes wrong or a piece of equipment failed. They would just panic and run around in circles complaining instead of just calling the manufacturer help line or trying to get someone sent out. It was nice being the go to person after only being there for a year. Once I got back into engineering I realized I was no longer a big shot hah.

#113 Clak

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 08:15 PM

Yeah, most of the time I never hear back about a position, not even a form letter.
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#114 AvengedBacklog

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Posted 10 March 2013 - 10:27 PM

Just read through the entire thread. Hope you all find something soon.

One route I suggest is temp agencies. I graduated college last May at 22 with a economics degree and spent my entire senior year filling out hundreds of applications only to end up with rejection after rejection. Well about 2 weeks after graduation I decided to apply through a temp agency for an accounting position and was brought in for an interview, agency liked me and got me a job at a large company doing some projects. Stayed there for 5 months building rapport with the manager and department and when a full-time position opened up I was pretty much instantly chosen thanks to my history there. So now less than a year after graduation I've got a solid job in finance, benefits, and the inside track on any other good corporate opportunities that come up in the company.

Check out those temp agencies, find a decent one that gives you holiday pay and stick it out for a few months. So many companies use that as their screening process nowadays so its definitely worth a shot.

#115 Malik112099

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 12:22 AM

Temp agencies don't really apply to some industries. Glad you found something but the closest thing to a temp agency in my industry is contract positions which is a whole other ball of wax.

#116 darkcecil32

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 01:04 AM

I'm assuming you are trying to get into the Big Four? Sometimes it is easier to get into a financial firm first, and then try to get into the Big Four after a few years of experience under your belt. They typically don't hire non-experienced graduates unless you have a stellar GPA and come from a top school. Ironically, one of the two that I spoke of in my previous post wants me to join his team in the Big Four (we both met and got our start in one of the lower-tier banks).

I would also suggest applying to jobs out of state. The higher profile cities obviously have more openings (NY and Chicago), while you can also apply to less desirable cities where the requirements won't be as strong (San Antonio). Think of it as studying abroad. Just get your few years experience out of state and move back to your home city.


I definitely agree with everything you said, Kendro. I'm trying to get in wherever I can. My initial aim was to get a corporate financial analyst position, preferably at a Fortune 500 firm (had a few interviews, no dice), out of college. Today, I'll really take whatever I can get. Building any sort of experience in the right industry is key, as you've said, and I definitely don't want to be pigeon-holed into doing what I do now moving forward. I've been applying for jobs all over the country (I ideally want to be in Seattle, currently in Upstate New York) with a mishmash of large cities and smaller ones.

I'm not aiming for the Big 4 in particular, (although I have some loose connections at all of the Big 4 besides Ernst and Young) as much as I am keeping myself apprised on industry trends. I come from a good but not amazing undergraduate program, but most classmates of mine, even mediocre ones, got jobs in the industry without a hitch. I tried to get a start as a bank teller at a local Bank of America branch a while back, but was told I was way over-qualified and should be looking for a corporate job :roll:.

I also had a memorable phone interview from an elite hedge fund where the interviewer told me that I interviewed very well and that he'd pass my resume onto a hiring manager, but since I didn't come from "Dartmouth, Yale, or Princeton" that I had virtually no realistic shot. He advised me to go to a top 15 business school and apply again after getting an MBA.

I get those "impressive qualifications but we went with someone that more closely matches our needs but we'll keep your resume on file aka some guy's buddy got the job" emails all the time. :-/


I'm in the same boat. Read through the entire thread and very sad to hear about your situation, Malik. I hope that things work out for you soon.

#117 kodave

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 02:48 AM

I also had a memorable phone interview from an elite hedge fund where the interviewer told me that I interviewed very well and that he'd pass my resume onto a hiring manager, but since I didn't come from "Dartmouth, Yale, or Princeton" that I had virtually no realistic shot. He advised me to go to a top 15 business school and apply again after getting an MBA.


It's always awesome when an interviewer insults you or your school or something like that. Once I basically got told "Well, I decided to interview you anyway even though you weren't in the top 15% of your class because of your work experience." Oh, gee, thanks. So kind of you to come down off your high horse to interview a peasant like me. And this was me interviewing for a position below where I normally would have been - so no shit I had the work experience you were looking for. It's also ironic because I've often found that the people who interview me don't have outstanding academic credentials themselves that they seem to want in their candidates. But apparently think those high academic credentials are key to doing the very kind of work that they're doing even though other things like work experience might matter more... despite the fact they don't meet their own academic qualifications. Its just absurdity out there. I guess in this kind of market they can demand certain qualifications, but you'd think some of these people without the most stellar backgrounds who are in positions to interview and hire would see the value in other things.


#118 Malik112099

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 03:13 AM

I had an interview for an avionics bench technician job (which I basically did in the Air Force for 10 years) and was given an electrical engineering test during the interview. Then they brought in an actual electrical engineer to grade the test in front of me. It was horrifying. I shit you not. Worst interview ever.

#119 Malik112099

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 04:00 PM

I am really disliking recruiters trying to push positions that are below my skill/education level. If I wanted that job I would have stopped going to school years ago and just settled.
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#120 Clak

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Posted 11 March 2013 - 04:08 PM

It bothers me when some of these companies act like it's an honor for them to even talk to you. HCA is a big employer here, and even with having gotten an in with a recruiter there through my fiance, the last folks I talked to acted like I wasn't good enough for them. Not that I wasn't qualified for the job, they weren't even looking for a degree, they just had a very elitist attitude I didn't appreciate. Of course they're also one of the largest employers in the area, so that's kind of an issue.
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