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#181 Invicta 61

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 07:07 AM

My college required a class for interviewing/resume building.

From what I was told (this was 10 years ago) a resume should be no more than one page and the person reading it should be able to tell if you meet the requirements for the position within 20-30 seconds of receiving it. Any more than one page is more than likely not going to be read by someone swamped with resumes. A second page may be included for references only.

If you have a portfolio to bring to the interview bring a spare copy to leave with the interviewer. One thing I included with my portfolio that many people do not was a few examples of writing (fake scenarios). It can help show that you are effective at communicating if it is necessary for the position.

Also, send a thank you letter a few days after your first interview. I wouldn't send it via e-mail, it's too impersonal and would more than likely get deleted as spam considering the volume of email most people receive these days.
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#182 yourlefthand

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 01:06 PM

My college required a class for interviewing/resume building.

From what I was told (this was 10 years ago) a resume should be no more than one page and the person reading it should be able to tell if you meet the requirements for the position within 20-30 seconds of receiving it. Any more than one page is more than likely not going to be read by someone swamped with resumes. A second page may be included for references only.

If you have a portfolio to bring to the interview bring a spare copy to leave with the interviewer. One thing I included with my portfolio that many people do not was a few examples of writing (fake scenarios). It can help show that you are effective at communicating if it is necessary for the position.

Also, send a thank you letter a few days after your first interview. I wouldn't send it via e-mail, it's too impersonal and would more than likely get deleted as spam considering the volume of email most people receive these days.


The whole point is that this is largely subjective. If you need two pages to show your experience I think it's probably ok as most of your competition will most likely have more than one page as well. Coming out if college there is no need for more than one page unless unless you have a lot of internship experience.

Leave references off your résumé. They'll ask for them when they want them.

#183 Malik112099

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 01:39 PM

I think it depends on the position you are applying for as well. Most of the positions I'm applying for I wouldn't think they would be ok with hiring someone with only one page worth of education and experience. I've talked to people who prefer 1 page and others who would take 4 if you could fill it up.

Definitely leave any extras (like references or work examples) off of a resume. Save those until asked for or for a portfolio.

Got another email from a different recruiter. Job looks good but it requires 50% travel. Might be ok with that tho.

#184 Clak

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 02:05 PM

I'm going to have to go with the "truth is in the middle" trope here.

Yeah, we all know that these are bullshit questions, but by the time you're sitting down in front of someone, it's already been established that you have the qualifications and the interview is really just a personality test. I mean who wants to work with an asshole on their team, right? Not me.

edit: The strangest question I've ever been asked was "do you feel lucky?" I was like wtf?

Was it an older gentleman, squinty eyes, tight lipped? Went by the name of Harry?

But I do kind of disagree with the idea that getting an interview means they think you're qualified. You'd assume that to be true, but sometimes it seems like they're just interviewing everyone who applied. I've had a few interviews they seemed to go really well, got along great with the person interviewing me, but nothing comes of it. It's about to the point that I'm ready to start being an asshole, because it seems like they're the ones getting the jobs.
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#185 Malik112099

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 03:09 PM

Great article on why companies aren't hiring/slow to hire right now. These people are getting 9 interviews before the companies decide not to hire at all! This is out of control.

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#186 Confucius

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 10:36 PM

Speaking for only myself, email thank yous are ok.

#187 WV Matsui

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 11:01 PM

My college required a class for interviewing/resume building.

From what I was told (this was 10 years ago) a resume should be no more than one page and the person reading it should be able to tell if you meet the requirements for the position within 20-30 seconds of receiving it. Any more than one page is more than likely not going to be read by someone swamped with resumes. A second page may be included for references only.

If you have a portfolio to bring to the interview bring a spare copy to leave with the interviewer. One thing I included with my portfolio that many people do not was a few examples of writing (fake scenarios). It can help show that you are effective at communicating if it is necessary for the position.

Also, send a thank you letter a few days after your first interview. I wouldn't send it via e-mail, it's too impersonal and would more than likely get deleted as spam considering the volume of email most people receive these days.


The one page rule is as old as your info. Two to three is fine if it is relevant info.

The portfolio info is great advice.

When it comes to the handwritten note vs the email, if you send me a letter I will have already made up my mind by the time I get it. If you don't send me a thank you email that day I more than likely wont hire you.

Just some info with a manager with 10+ years of hiring experience.
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#188 Mana Knight

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 11:05 PM

For a while, it was a decent place to work, although I think it started to go downhill shortly after I started there. I've worked in two different Targets, and the first one back in 2010 was good as my hours stayed consistent. The second one where I'm at now, started decent, but the demands have gotten more outrageous as time goes by. Maybe it varies by store, but the store I'm at now I've been averaging 10-15 hours for the past month and a half and the store as a whole is understaffed. Feels like Target is a glorified Wal-Mart at this point in time.

I noticed the same too w/ my Target. I gotta wait a while in line unlike the old days.
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#189 Tony Stark

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 11:09 PM

i believe the key to your guys talk about one page v. two pages is this:

if you worked at McDonalds when you were 15 in high school and that is what is left hanging on the second page no one cares

but if your education takes up half a page already then of course you should list important (stuff you can brag about) employment

general rule, if you wouldnt tell a guy/girl what you do/did on a date, or are asshamed of something, why put it on the resume?

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#190 kodave

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 11:16 PM

The one page rule is as old as your info. Two to three is fine if it is relevant info.

The portfolio info is great advice.

When it comes to the handwritten note vs the email, if you send me a letter I will have already made up my mind by the time I get it. If you don't send me a thank you email that day I more than likely wont hire you.

Just some info with a manager with 10+ years of hiring experience.


But what if they email the thank you the next day?

It's like this shit:



It's like there's no winning even for being reasonable.


#191 dohdough

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Posted 20 March 2013 - 11:21 PM

Was it an older gentleman, squinty eyes, tight lipped? Went by the name of Harry?

But I do kind of disagree with the idea that getting an interview means they think you're qualified. You'd assume that to be true, but sometimes it seems like they're just interviewing everyone who applied. I've had a few interviews they seemed to go really well, got along great with the person interviewing me, but nothing comes of it. It's about to the point that I'm ready to start being an asshole, because it seems like they're the ones getting the jobs.

Haha...no. It was a youngish guy. I suppose you'd be right in most cases, but it hasn't been my experience.

On the job front, I was supposed to get a callback today on a new gig, but I guess I'll have to wait til tomorrow. I know that at least one of my references has been contacted already and pretty much unofficially offered the job at the end of the interview.
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#192 WV Matsui

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 02:12 AM

But what if they email the thank you the next day?

It's like this shit:



It's like there's no winning even for being reasonable.


Haha great movie

Honestly I always sent my email that same day. Hell with cell phones you can do it in the parking lot after your interview nowadays.

In this economy I would do anything to get ahead and to catch the attention of a manager like myself.

That quick email the same day takes two minutes and really goes a long way.

Edit - also do your research. If you apply for an email developer position be sure to check out their emails and see what system they are using etc. If you are applying for a Social Media position take a look at their properties to be able to better understand they philosophy. Also be sure to check out the company's about us section of their website. I have had plenty an employer "quiz" me about certain things on their company profile.

Edited by WV Matsui, 21 March 2013 - 02:22 AM.

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#193 Invicta 61

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 02:21 AM

The one page rule is as old as your info. Two to three is fine if it is relevant info.

The portfolio info is great advice.

When it comes to the handwritten note vs the email, if you send me a letter I will have already made up my mind by the time I get it. If you don't send me a thank you email that day I more than likely wont hire you.

Just some info with a manager with 10+ years of hiring experience.


Yeah, kinda expected most of those techniques to be outdated since my last interview was seven years ago. Worked like a champ back then though; used that style twice and was hired both times.

The whole job search process is a huge pain in the ass. I feel sorry for you guys going through it now, especially with things the way they are currently.
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#194 WV Matsui

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 02:25 AM

I'm just curious...

How many of you have complete linkedin profiles?
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#195 Malik112099

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 02:38 AM

I'm just curious...

How many of you have complete linkedin profiles?


I have a 100% complete profile. I use it to apply to jobs all the time.

Also, about the emails, I email as soon as I get home. The people that interviewed me have a thank you email within an hour of seeing my face.

The one page rule is as outdated as needing an objective statement IMHO.

#196 Clak

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 02:57 AM

I am glad that some of the dumber resume fluff is seen to be just that, fluff. Objective statements and other things like it. I'D also like to add on the resume length question, that at least for IT stuff, it's honestly ok if the resume is pages long, as long as you're showing a progression of skills, even if you're listing the same thing from multiple jobs, it shows that you've developed that same skill over a long time period.
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#197 Kendro

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 03:08 AM

Anyone have any negotiating tips when it comes to an offer? Consider the employer loves the candidate and considers them the perfect candidate. I heard that 80% of companies expect a negotiation. Is it okay to automatically request 10% on top of their offer considering the worst they can do is say no?

Are employers actually afraid of rejecting an employee's request for a higher offer as much as an employee is afraid of asking an employee for a higher offer?

#198 Malik112099

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 04:07 AM

Anyone have any negotiating tips when it comes to an offer? Consider the employer loves the candidate and considers them the perfect candidate. I heard that 80% of companies expect a negotiation. Is it okay to automatically request 10% on top of their offer considering the worst they can do is say no?

Are employers actually afraid of rejecting an employee's request for a higher offer as much as an employee is afraid of asking an employee for a higher offer?



Slippery slope. You don't want to seem greedy and at the same time you don't want them to think you'll just settle. I would not recommend you automatically ask for 10% more. I think that before you get completely serious about a position you need to know what you are willing to accept as fair compensation. Once you find that number it can waver depending on the benefits package they offer. Better benefits = your number can drop a little. Subpar benefits = a number a little higher. That's what you shoot for. If they offer you something more than fair and you shoot right back with a request for 10% more (which can be quite a bit depending on the initial offer) you could be putting a bad taste in their mouth and shooting yourself in the foot for no reason.

I also wouldn't suggest jumping on an offer immediately. Even if you know 100% you will take it, don't act desperate.

#199 Spokker

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 04:17 AM

There are so many application/resume/job interview superstitions it's not funny. I suppose it's good to know what people are thinking about this, but it's going to come down to the person doing the hiring and whatever their superstitions are.

The whole thing is a crapshoot and I believe the least effective way to gauge a potential employee's worth is the interview. I'd make it 10% of the decision and weigh the other factors more.

And in the vast majority of cases we make out these jobs to be more than they really are. We're not all interviewing for executive VP or some shit.

#200 Malik112099

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 02:01 PM

And in the vast majority of cases we make out these jobs to be more than they really are. We're not all interviewing for executive VP or some shit.


A job interview is huge for me. Especially if its a job I really want. I don't look at it as interviewing for some job. I'm interviewing for my family's livelihood and the roof over our heads. Way more important than some VP position.

#201 Clak

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 02:05 PM

There are sites which list compensation figures for different jobs, although I wouldn't trust them 100%, they should be pretty close.
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#202 frostybroc

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 02:20 PM

A job interview is huge for me. Especially if its a job I really want. I don't look at it as interviewing for some job. I'm interviewing for my family's livelihood and the roof over our heads. Way more important than some VP position.


That's too much emphasis on it. Focusing on that alone can make the situation more stressful than what it should. If you don't have a job yet, I wouldn't focus on that when it comes to the interview.

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#203 Spokker

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 03:05 PM

A job interview is huge for me. Especially if its a job I really want. I don't look at it as interviewing for some job. I'm interviewing for my family's livelihood and the roof over our heads. Way more important than some VP position.

What I am saying is that, balancing the perspective of employees and employers, we are probably all over-thinking what works and what does not. The risk of a low to mid-level employee not working out is overblown as long as the prerequisites are met and we should all just calm down. The person's background is going to be more important than a 15-minute interview where everybody is on their best behavior based on what they think they should be doing. We should admit that the interview is only marginally useful.

#204 irideabike

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 03:15 PM

Just don't be stupid when it comes to wages. If it seems a hundred or two low a week, tell the interviewer. If it looks good to you and you have no problem with it agree to it. No need to push your luck if you are already unemployeed (though if you have employment already I'd throw a number out there that doesn't seem too bad).

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#205 Malik112099

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 05:13 PM

We all know the interview is a small part of it but it is the most nerve wracking. It's the first impression. I've read shit about people not getting hired because the interviewer didn't like the cologne/perfume the person was wearing. Some of these people are super shallow and some of them are really cool. You never know what you are gonna get.

#206 Confucius

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 05:32 PM

The interview isn't overrated. If you have 10 people with similar experiences (and in todays world that might be low), what else are you going to base your decision on?

Of course the interview is going to be most of the hiring decision. I realize that you might lose out on 1 out of 1000 qualified candidates because they are really shitty at interviewing. But that's their own fault. Interviewing is a skill just like every other job skill.

If you lowered the importance of the interview, what would you up the percentage on if everyone had the same background?

Malik - you are putting way too much pressure on yourself. That's why it's so nerve wracking.

#207 WV Matsui

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 05:55 PM

If you have a ton of great work experience and you are having trouble finding a good job when you know you are qualified never underestimate paying for a resume writer if you have the cash.

When I decided to change jobs 3 years ago I found a résumé writer via LinkedIn and paid for a professional revision of my résumé. It cost me $500 but I doubled my salary. Definitely worth a look at if you think it is your résumé that is keeping you from getting calls.
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#208 Spokker

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 06:59 PM

The interview isn't overrated. If you have 10 people with similar experiences (and in todays world that might be low), what else are you going to base your decision on?

Rock, paper, scissors.

Of course the interview is going to be most of the hiring decision.

But it logically cannot be. Your background determines whether or not you even get the interview.

If you have a ton of great work experience and you are having trouble finding a good job when you know you are qualified never underestimate paying for a resume writer if you have the cash.

When I decided to change jobs 3 years ago I found a résumé writer via LinkedIn and paid for a professional revision of my résumé. It cost me $500 but I doubled my salary. Definitely worth a look at if you think it is your résumé that is keeping you from getting calls.

And this is even crazier. People should admit that in the vast majority of cases, they will never, ever know for sure what put them over the top or got them denied for a job.

#209 soulvengeance

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 07:23 PM

The person's background is going to be more important than a 15-minute interview where everybody is on their best behavior based on what they think they should be doing. We should admit that the interview is only marginally useful.


You would be tremendously surprised what people say in interviews, they are definitely not always on their best behavior. Their background is helpful, but even if they look like they have the qualifications on paper, it doesn't always work out due to their personality, which tends to come out in an interview.
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#210 irideabike

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Posted 21 March 2013 - 07:37 PM

Ya, I've been involved in interviews and am close with some people in the HR department and there are a dozen people with the exact same qualifications as you for every position. The interview matters a TON. The way you dress, speak, smell, how you talk about previous employers.

There are no shortcuts. No do-overs. What happened, happened. Trust me. I know. All of this matters.

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