Jump to content



Photo
- - - - -

Do extracurriculars matter... in college?


  • Please log in to reply
47 replies to this topic

#31 Antiques Roadshow

Antiques Roadshow

    Dick Tracy

  • CAGiversary!

Posted 23 March 2006 - 01:24 AM

I'd only do it for self-enrichment. Colleges want you to do them for $$$; but you should do them for yourself.

I've taken quite a few classes outside of my requirements. In fact, I'm not even working under my "plan", anymore. I'm just taking classes I want to take.

Krumm_walk.gifOblina_walk.gifIckus_walk.gif

I'm looking for SNES games. PM me.


#32 swetooth9

swetooth9

    Go Tar Heels!

  • CAGiversary!

Posted 23 March 2006 - 02:01 AM

tagged for next two years

#33 TheBlueWizard

TheBlueWizard

    Indeed, O'Neill

  • CAGiversary!

Posted 23 March 2006 - 02:04 AM

But do you NEED these extracurriculars to get an internship if you have really good grades?


Yes, even more so. If your grades are too high, employers may think that you only sit around and study all of the time. From people I knew in college, those that were more involved than just classes got more job offers than people with far better grades. The first company I worked for wouldn't even interview people with a 3.5 or better unless they had tons of extras. Employers want well balanced people who can interact with their coworkers and customers as well as manage their time. Being involved is just one way to do this.

I had a 3.0, limited work experience but a lot of extra curricular stuff and I got several more offers for jobs that people who only studied, with grades 3.5 and above.

Here's one relevant story about me in particular. I was in the marching band at Iowa State. I would say that 9 out of 10 interviewers first question was "What's it like to be in a college marching band?" Its an easy question for me to answer and really broke the ice.

Bottom line, get involved. It can't hurt. I was always busy in college, shy when I started as a freshman but by the time I was done, I was in several leadership positions and it only helped me out when I needed it.

Hope this helps some.

TBW
"There are geeks, I am their leader."

Posted Image
Collection

#34 dopa345

dopa345

    All around nice guy

  • CAGiversary!

Posted 23 March 2006 - 08:00 PM

Grades usually just a starting point for most employers. If you meet their cut-off, they they'll want to know what kind of person you are and your extracurriculars will reflect that.

#35 doraemonkerpal

doraemonkerpal

    CAGiversary!

  • CAGiversary!

Posted 23 March 2006 - 08:54 PM

Is OSU Ohio, Oregon or Oklahoma?


Ohio :)

"O-H...!"

Well, to be honest, it's hard for people to be outraged about something once they know the facts. And it takes more effort to dig up facts than be outraged. ;)

Posted Image "Meatloaf, smeatloaf, double-beatloaf. I hate meatloaf."
:whee: http://www.mixmakers.net/forums/

#36 miniarnold

miniarnold

    I Like Coffee

  • CAGiversary!

Posted 23 March 2006 - 09:15 PM

I was an accounting major also for my undergrad. I had a 4.0 for most of my time in college, and I ended up graduating with a 3.9. Only one firm I interviewed with mentioned my GPA, the others didn't care.

If you're going to be taking part in something solely to put it on your resume, be a leader in it. I was in the accounting "fraternity" (and I use that term lightly) Beta Alpha Psi solely to put it on my resume, and when ever it got brought up in interviews, it was followed by the question, "which office did you hold".

Also, join a large fraternity/sorority, or make friends with people in one. Most of the people are ridiculously shallow, but you would not believe what kind of business contacts you can make (why else do the very wealthy send their kids to elite schools). This was how I got my first job:
  • I became friends with a frat-guy in a Coporate Tax Accounting class
  • that was fraternity brothers with another guy
  • who's dad was the manager for a local office of a big financial firm
  • who pulled some strings with a friend in another department to hire me

Posted Image

#37 RacinReaver

RacinReaver

Posted 23 March 2006 - 09:22 PM

One of the important things is what kind of job you're looking to get. I know there's employers that come to my school looking for people with a 3.5 or higher GPA only, so having buttloads of activities won't help you out a whole lot.

Of course, that's not to say that you shouldn't do any. I'm in Materials Science and I try to volunteer for all the activities we sponsor around the school and the surrounding area. I do it because, yeah, it does look good on a resume, but they also tend to be a lot of fun. I used to be involved in some groups outside of my major, but I had a hard time sticking with them since meetings were often scheduled at times when I had classes so I had to ditch them.

Also, something that nobody's mentioned so far (at least, that I remember reading) is to apply for scholarships and awards. They're a great thing to have on your resume. So even if the award is only $100 or something small, it's another thing to say that you've gotten and if it's from your field, then it's a total plus.

#38 Admiral Ackbar

Admiral Ackbar

    It's a trap!

  • CAGiversary!

Posted 23 March 2006 - 09:27 PM

Moonshinin'! Them college recruitioners love them the moonshinin'!

If it wasn't for moonshinin', Burt Reynolds woulda never got his dum gad education at Florida State.

Posted Image

This is how the big three approached E3 this year IMO.

 

Microsoft: "Americans love the xbox like grandma and apple pie."

Sony: "Apples! How do you like them apples!"

Nintendo: "Err, who wants to play Mario Kart? Anybody?"


#39 vietgurl

vietgurl

    CAGiversary!

  • CAGiversary!

Posted 24 March 2006 - 12:58 AM

So basically experience and internships are important if you want to find a good job after you graduate? What about for graduate school or med school?
Posted Image

#40 Koggit

Koggit

    almost sorry

  • CAGiversary!

Posted 24 March 2006 - 02:41 AM

No offense, but how does a 3.7 in business land you in honors? UW's Honors Program has an average GPA of 3.95, and business/social science people are pretty much required a 4.0... only science/math majors are accepted with anything below a high 3.9. I have a 3.85 toward physics and even I wouldn't dream of applying to the honors program here. Does your school grade really hard or something?

Anyway, on topic, extracurriculars are important, but also join clubs you enjoy. A gaming club, snowboarding club, whatever. Just to meet as many people as you can. It's more important than you think.

#41 RedvsBlue

RedvsBlue

    Rocket Science Level

  • CAGiversary!

Posted 24 March 2006 - 02:59 AM

So basically experience and internships are important if you want to find a good job after you graduate? What about for graduate school or med school?


Those are based mostly on the applicable test (MCAT, LSAT, etc.) and your GPA. Extracurriculars are just kind of a bonus.

#42 dopa345

dopa345

    All around nice guy

  • CAGiversary!

Posted 24 March 2006 - 04:03 AM

So basically experience and internships are important if you want to find a good job after you graduate? What about for graduate school or med school?


Extracurriculars are extremely important for med school. Having gone through the process myself, the objective stuff (grades and MCAT scores) are used as a cut off for which applicants will get interviews. After that you need to differentiate yourself somehow and the best way to do that is with extracurricular stuff (volunteer work, research) and during the interview. I would imagine that this would be the same for competitive graduate programs but med school definitely requires this.

#43 senorwoohoo

senorwoohoo

Posted 24 March 2006 - 04:12 AM

As other people have said, internships are the key. Even if they are unpaid, they are worth it in the long run because the experience is worth it times 1000000. I am currently doing a part-time internship and loving it because seeing my name in print is fuckin' sweet.

#44 RacinReaver

RacinReaver

Posted 24 March 2006 - 05:46 AM

Extracurriculars are extremely important for med school. Having gone through the process myself, the objective stuff (grades and MCAT scores) are used as a cut off for which applicants will get interviews. After that you need to differentiate yourself somehow and the best way to do that is with extracurricular stuff (volunteer work, research) and during the interview. I would imagine that this would be the same for competitive graduate programs but med school definitely requires this.


Yeah, seconding the research thing if you're going into a technical field. I've been doing research in one form or another since my Freshman year and it's helped me build contacts with professors, go to a few conferences, and, hopefully sometime this summer, get a paper published. From everything I've heard from my professors, that's much better than having been president of the underwater basketweaving club any day of the week.

No offense, but how does a 3.7 in business land you in honors? UW's Honors Program has an average GPA of 3.95, and business/social science people are pretty much required a 4.0... only science/math majors are accepted with anything below a high 3.9. I have a 3.85 toward physics and even I wouldn't dream of applying to the honors program here. Does your school grade really hard or something?


It really depends on the school that you're attending. I only kinow of one person within my major that has a 4.0, and very few of us are pulling over a 3.75 overall (what's required for Dean's List here). When you take a class, what's the usual percentage of people that get As, Bs and Cs?

#45 Koggit

Koggit

    almost sorry

  • CAGiversary!

Posted 24 March 2006 - 09:15 PM

It really depends on the school that you're attending. I only kinow of one person within my major that has a 4.0, and very few of us are pulling over a 3.75 overall (what's required for Dean's List here). When you take a class, what's the usual percentage of people that get As, Bs and Cs?


Most classes do a bell curve, in sciences the average has to be (req'd by administration) a 2.6, so they usually curve down, and for humanities it can range from 2.9 to 3.3 (if the class average is below 2.9 they have to curve up to 2.9, if it's above 3.3 they have to curve down to 3.3). Other classes, like social sciences, maths, PE credit, etc, aren't regulated. Many are easy GPA boosters, except the math courses which are usually around 2.8-2.9 uncurved. The school-wide average GPA is 3.1, but that's just because there aren't many science majors. A lot of business.

#46 RacinReaver

RacinReaver

Posted 24 March 2006 - 10:41 PM

If they have to curve a class down then the tests are usually too easy. :p

I know on lots of exams I take the high grade will usually be around an 80 and the low close to a 20-30. That tends to give a much better grade distribution (and, as far as I'm concerned, fairer) to give a curve off of instead of the traditional slamming everyone into 30% of the scale. I don't know of any 'official' requirements for curves here, generally professors just give a curve how they think it should be. For example, I know my year has consistently higher grades on average than the year ahead of us since, from what the professors tell us, we tend to learn the material a lot better.

Of course, if you're at a really huge school the requirements to get into the honors school probably are a bit more stringent. I know we don't even have one here, but that's probably because it's darned hard enough to get into in the first place. =p

#47 Dead of Knight

Dead of Knight

Posted 25 March 2006 - 06:32 PM

No offense, but how does a 3.7 in business land you in honors? UW's Honors Program has an average GPA of 3.95, and business/social science people are pretty much required a 4.0... only science/math majors are accepted with anything below a high 3.9. I have a 3.85 toward physics and even I wouldn't dream of applying to the honors program here. Does your school grade really hard or something?


OSU (Ohio State)'s honors program is COMPLETELY different from what you appear to be talking about at your college. You are accepted as an honors student when you are accepted into the university. You generally have to have a 1300 SAT (from the old SAT scores) or a 29 ACT and be in the top 10% of your high school class. So yeah, what we are talking about is totally different. OSU has other, more stringent programs that are more like what you are talking about, but they just aren't called the same thing.
RIP Hiroshi Yamauchi

This is the greatest thing ever. Certainly in the OTT at least.


#48 afedock

afedock

    CAGiversary!

  • CAGiversary!

Posted 25 March 2006 - 06:54 PM

depends on your major. Im an electrical engineer and while an engineering frat or whatever might look good, It probably wont get me a job. Focus on getting internships during the summer, much more important for your future.
Posted Image Posted Image