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Graduating Soon, Entry Level Position Advice?


#1 jaydepps   CAGiversary! Lowball Ban   1333 Posts   Joined 12.1 Years Ago  

Posted 19 January 2011 - 01:10 AM

I am graduating this Spring with a major in Sport Management and minors in Business Management and Communications. I have spoken with several representatives from the school and have a few options I can explore, but I was just thinking as sort of a "backup" to apply with non-sport related businesses such as GE, Motorola, etc. I was just curious if anyone knew of any video game companies with headquarters based in or around the Massachusetts area? I still have to determine which field I would like to begin my career hopefully in. I have narrowed it down to Human Resources and Advertising. I took several classes covering both topics and I feel they are the likely fields I will pursue. Thanks for any and all suggestions.

#2 HotShotX   CAGiversary! CAGiversary!   3532 Posts   Joined 14.6 Years Ago  

Posted 19 January 2011 - 01:32 AM

I am graduating this Spring with a major in Sport Management and minors in Business Management and Communications. I have spoken with several representatives from the school and have a few options I can explore, but I was just thinking as sort of a "backup" to apply with non-sport related businesses such as GE, Motorola, etc. I was just curious if anyone knew of any video game companies with headquarters based in or around the Massachusetts area? I still have to determine which field I would like to begin my career hopefully in. I have narrowed it down to Human Resources and Advertising. I took several classes covering both topics and I feel they are the likely fields I will pursue. Thanks for any and all suggestions.


I'm an engineer, so I don't have much advice on your field. However, I will say as a recent grad (2 years ago) that considering the current job market, you better consider the possibility that you may have to seek employment out of state, and relocate.

Good luck in your search.

~HotShotX

#3 jaydepps   CAGiversary! Lowball Ban   1333 Posts   Joined 12.1 Years Ago  

Posted 19 January 2011 - 01:34 AM

Thanks. I am fully open to out of state and even country employment. With 3-4 hours of Massachusetts is ideal, but not required. I am essentially open to most jobs at this stage in my career so long as the salary is enough to pay student loans and provide a bare minimum for living expenses.

#4 Mana Knight   Cloud Strife CAGiversary!   14401 Posts   Joined 16.0 Years Ago  

Mana Knight

Posted 19 January 2011 - 01:38 AM

I don't even want to discuss how horrible my situation was. Despite having an Engineering related degree, I STRUGGLED to find an entry level job out of college. Pretty much every place was on a hiring freeze. Sucked because I lacked experience in the field too. I went 1 year unemployed. Eventually I took some job sort of related to my degree (just only required an AA degree instead of a bachelors and not very challenging) just to do something. Quite honestly, I'm disappointed in myself, but the pay is good and all I can do until something else opens up.

I moved from IN to MD.

#5 RAMSTORIA   fate is inexorable CAGiversary!   11980 Posts   Joined 16.0 Years Ago  

Posted 19 January 2011 - 01:42 AM

Best thing I can say is, don't be afraid to settle. Even though you've narrowed it down to two fields, look outside of those fields. I'm not sure what your situation is (ie, living at home, car payment etc) so you may have more flexibility while looking for a job. If you need some money in the short term, look to a temp agency.

I settled with my current employer a little over 3 years ago. I was unemployed for several months and was hired as a temp, I was then hired on full time a few months later. It wasn't my dream job (I work in insurance), but a paycheck is a paycheck. I've gotten a couple promotions since I've started (back in 2007), I make significantly more than I did, have great benefits, they match on a 401k... it could be worse. It's still not my dream job even though it's much better than it was when I first started, but it pays the bills and then some.

#6 Morrigan Lover   CAGiversary! CAGiversary!   663 Posts   Joined 15.6 Years Ago  

Morrigan Lover

Posted 19 January 2011 - 01:45 AM

As an Electrical Engineer, my number 1 advice for new grads is to have a portfolio of completed projects.

My number 2 advice is to post this portfolio on a website (your school should give you free hosting i.e. "www.schoolname.edu/~morriganlover/"). This gives employers access to your work both before and after the interview. I have PCB designs, source code, rapid prototypes, etc. on my portfolio.

Advice #3: Start your own tiny business doing what you like while in school. This shows initiative. In my case, I started my own video game company which sells games on the android marketplace. Even if profits are just beer money, it shows I can complete a commercial project from start to finish.

Not sure how advice 1,2, and 3 apply to sports management, because I don't have a clue what sports managers do. Is it like advertising? In that case, you could show your film design skills on youtube.

#7 gregthomas77   Custom User Title CAGiversary!   1984 Posts   Joined 15.3 Years Ago  

gregthomas77

Posted 19 January 2011 - 01:56 AM

I am sure you have checked it out before, but go to teamworkonline.com

#8 jaydepps   CAGiversary! Lowball Ban   1333 Posts   Joined 12.1 Years Ago  

Posted 19 January 2011 - 02:03 AM

Well it is a broader topic. Sports management essentially covers various facets of sports including financing, human resources, accounting, advertising, marketing, brand management, etc. It is essentially a business degree, but with a sports theme.

Thanks for all the advice so far. Any and all is valuable. I never thought about a temp agency. There are two in my current hometown. I don't really know all that much about the concept. I will have to contact them. I've always wanted to start a small business. That was a dream of mine, but I could never figure out what I was able to do. I still am pondering the idea of starting an online video game store, but I am not sure about it.

#9 QiG   I'm all out of gum.. CAGiversary!   2866 Posts   Joined 13.5 Years Ago  

Posted 19 January 2011 - 02:33 AM

In accounting, interning was an absolute must or you're gonna be working 10x harder to get a crap job.

#10 Dokstarr   Tap, Snap or Nap CAGiversary!   2231 Posts   Joined 13.1 Years Ago  

Posted 19 January 2011 - 02:51 AM

I don't know much about sports management, but I definitely apply to other companies unrelated to your major. If you don't find what you exactly want you want to fall back on something to have some work experience behind you. It's not easy out there so don't get discouraged. I graduated with engineering degree and had problems finding a job. I had 2 yrs of full time Co-Op experience and had to take a job related to my field but not what I specifically wanted after the job I had lined up fell through. After two years of doing that I recently got another engineering job that is pretty much what I was hoping for. Good luck!

#11 jaydepps   CAGiversary! Lowball Ban   1333 Posts   Joined 12.1 Years Ago  

Posted 19 January 2011 - 03:02 AM

I'm up for almost anything. Even if it has nothing to do with my job. I'm okay with it being a miserable job so long as the money is enough. I have 1 job lined up, but it is a last resort. I was a manager of some local grocer, working on the loading dock. So at the least I can return there.

#12 donteatsoap7   CAGiversary! CAGiversary!   253 Posts   Joined 11.3 Years Ago  

donteatsoap7

Posted 19 January 2011 - 03:19 AM

As an Electrical Engineer, my number 1 advice for new grads is to have a portfolio of completed projects.

My number 2 advice is to post this portfolio on a website (your school should give you free hosting i.e. "www.schoolname.edu/~morriganlover/"). This gives employers access to your work both before and after the interview. I have PCB designs, source code, rapid prototypes, etc. on my portfolio.

Advice #3: Start your own tiny business doing what you like while in school. This shows initiative. In my case, I started my own video game company which sells games on the android marketplace. Even if profits are just beer money, it shows I can complete a commercial project from start to finish.

Not sure how advice 1,2, and 3 apply to sports management, because I don't have a clue what sports managers do. Is it like advertising? In that case, you could show your film design skills on youtube.



I'm graduating high school this Friday and hopefully starting college on the 24th. I still haven't registered :oops: for college but I want to do things involving green energy (plus A LOT more). But I do not only want to know about current things, I want to make them myself. So, would my portfolio include my blueprints for ideas? What else would I include in it? Volunteer work, etc.? When I get my first degree, I want it to be something that could get me a job such as Geek Squad but help with the energy projects. And one more thing, does anyone have an idea for a small business I could do? Making Android games would be pretty cool, but I like making the website the store is on more, etc.

(sorry for basically hijacking your thread, but I saw the topic and couldn't resist asking)

#13 2DMention   Cyberpunk CAGiversary!   3842 Posts   Joined 14.0 Years Ago  

Posted 19 January 2011 - 02:06 PM

I'd say don't count out Temp/contract jobs. The best agencies try to match you with companies related to your major, or they at least did with me.

They don't always lead to permenent employment, but can if you're lucky.

#14 Javery   Drug-Dealer-Keeper-Awayer CAGiversary!   22425 Posts   Joined 16.6 Years Ago  

Posted 19 January 2011 - 02:27 PM

Harmonix is in Cambridge. Irrational Games/2K Boston is in.... Boston. That's all I can think of off the top of my head...

#15 drkpendragon   CAG Veteran CAG Veteran   25 Posts   Joined 13.4 Years Ago  

drkpendragon

Posted 19 January 2011 - 02:55 PM

I graduated a few months ago and it's pretty awful. Finding a job out of the country will likely be impossible right now. Don't spend all of your time looking at the big name companies either because they are not hiring people without real experience for the most part. Companies can, and are being very picky right now. They are able to get people with 2~4 years of experience to do entry level work without a problem.

Depending on your economic situation, you only have two real options. If you have the money, the best bet would likely be trying internships at places you would like to work. You'll likely only get $10 an hour or less, but you may be offered a job after the internship. If you don't have that option, look for smaller companies. You will not get paid as well as you would have in the past, but it's the only option if you want to work within the next year or two.

I've heard some people say they had success with a temporary agency. While I personally hate this idea as you are forced to take a very low pay until you are hired by a company, you may find luck with it. I think a paid internship is a much better idea, but even decent internships are difficult to find.

#16 Clak   Made of star stuff. CAGiversary!   8079 Posts   Joined 11.3 Years Ago  

Posted 19 January 2011 - 03:24 PM

It's impossible to even find an internship around here. i've got 3 semesters left before I finish my bachelors, hoping things are better by then. I can only imagine how bad it is for those with less marketable degrees.

#17

Guest_strongpimphand_*

Posted 19 January 2011 - 03:29 PM

My advice?

careershift.com

Last year I googled promo codes for it and found ND had one. It was suppose to be only for a year....but it rolled over to another year (now it doesn't expire until next dec)

That site will crawl the net for every...single...fuckin'...job. And I'm talking about you can censor the listings to be employee site only. Many jobs you never heard of by some small company who posted it on their website in hopes of someone finding it.


In this economy though, work experience reigns supreme. And also, they're going to want to find anything and everything wrong with you before you get hired. The company I'm working at now didn't hire me initially. Said I lived too far away (I read their interview notes....because they left 'em out for me to read basically!)

And that was the only thing that was wrong. If the other guy didn't spurn them at the last minute, I'd been screwed because I was on my last dollar.

So my 2nd piece of advice: Have the strongest resume possible. Bounce that bitch around as much as you can to everyone who has a job looking at resumes. Mine was bullet proof last year.

3rd...just don't give up. I went from looking in a 25 mile radius....to 100 mile radius. I work 70 miles away from home currently. That's life man.

#18 Anexanhume   Charge! CAGiversary!   3048 Posts   Joined 14.2 Years Ago  

Anexanhume

Posted 19 January 2011 - 06:42 PM

Missionary. You don't want to get too fancy starting out.

#19 2DMention   Cyberpunk CAGiversary!   3842 Posts   Joined 14.0 Years Ago  

Posted 19 January 2011 - 06:55 PM

.just don't give up. I went from looking in a 25 mile radius....to 100 mile radius. I work 70 miles away from home currently. That's life man.


Reading this makes me feel better. I thought I worked a long way from home (42 miles). 70 mi is just insane. Do you listen to podcasts on your commute home?

I'm still waiting for the self-driving car so I can play RPGs on my commute back and forth.

#20 jaydepps   CAGiversary! Lowball Ban   1333 Posts   Joined 12.1 Years Ago  

Posted 19 January 2011 - 07:40 PM

Thanks for all the ideas. I will look into Careershift. I've been using indeed, monster, and hotjobs.

#21 drkpendragon   CAG Veteran CAG Veteran   25 Posts   Joined 13.4 Years Ago  

drkpendragon

Posted 20 January 2011 - 06:39 AM

Thanks for all the ideas. I will look into Careershift. I've been using indeed, monster, and hotjobs.


I've had much better luck looking directly at companies websites. I'm not sure about Careershift as he said it pulls job listings from companies websites, but it's always worth checking companies career sections directly.

#22 Clak   Made of star stuff. CAGiversary!   8079 Posts   Joined 11.3 Years Ago  

Posted 20 January 2011 - 03:06 PM

Everything I've read has said that for the most part, the majority of jobs are gotten through networking. Companies get so many applications through job sites that they may never even see yours.

#23 D_Icon   'D'_ott_Elitist CAGiversary!   1613 Posts   Joined 14.2 Years Ago  

Posted 20 January 2011 - 04:12 PM

PSY major here (6months ago). Haven't found a job in my field that has given me a call back. All due to lack of experience. It's gotten frustrating so I went and got a security training certificate, I've been getting more calls for interviews for that type of work than for social service jobs.

So for all of you about to graduate or still in school what counts is experience, experience, experience & experience.

Probably gonna get into law enforcement now.

#24 Soodmeg  

Posted 20 January 2011 - 04:34 PM

Do entry level positions still exist I am pretty sure they are going the way of the dodo bird.

In my career field (I know we are talking about yours so feel free to ignore this) its all about networking, networking, networking. You cant get a job unless someone knows you exist.

Meet as many people in your field as humanly possible and I am talking about individual people not just sending your resume to the HR rep. Not only can they teach you things that school couldnt but they can guide you in the right direction in all aspects of your career. I really dont think there is a shortcut for it. The years of getting out of school for a waiting job are over for most people.

Post grad internships (which really suck if you dont get a good one) are the best way to further your knowledge get some experience and networking.

#25

Guest_strongpimphand_*

Posted 20 January 2011 - 06:55 PM

Reading this makes me feel better. I thought I worked a long way from home (42 miles). 70 mi is just insane. Do you listen to podcasts on your commute home?

I'm still waiting for the self-driving car so I can play RPGs on my commute back and forth.

thankfully I have a friend that lets me stay at his crib half the time...and I only work 4 days a week/40 hours instead of 5 days/40 hours...

So I get to cut down half the time traveling. And w/these gas prices....its real helpful!

#26 Sk   CAGiversary! CAGiversary!   697 Posts   Joined 16.0 Years Ago  

Posted 20 January 2011 - 07:10 PM

I hope you went to a very good school if you want to work for GE or Motorola as your first real job. Either that or you had some sort of bomb ass internship.

In any case, I think the biggest problem you'll face is the fact you have a sports mngt degree and business mngt degree. My friend got respectable grades and went to really nice school with the same degrees you got and all he is a glorified ticket teller at a sports stadium. Not that many people make it in the sports management field.

I know yahoo and the likes say a management degree is desirable but in fact it really isn't unless you have a good deal of Management experience. Unfortunately no one will make a kid right out of college a manager. Most cases an employer is going to want to know what you can do for them. What are your business skills and what sort of knowledge do you bring to the table. At least with an Accounting or Finance degree you can show them your skill sets. A lot of jobs I've interviewed for required you pass an Accounting or Finance test after or during the first interview. Management and Marketing at least at my school always seemed like the degrees business students got if they couldn't handle accounting or finance. Management is mostly a bunch of bullshit and made up concepts and diagrams (much like marketing). The few exceptions to this rule are Scientific MNGT and Production MNGT. You'll really have to show off your skill sets somehow and show your potential employers how you can provide them and there customers value. A lot of businesses might be confused as to why you're not applying for a job in the sports field since thats where you're expertise is. Expect to be asked about that.

I will say though if you can get a job with GE or Motorola go for it. Motorola has amazing employee training. I don't think they're higher mostly from the fact they're splitting the company into 2 new IPO's. If you could work for GE thats the way to go. They're a much larger titan of their industry (they literally do just about everything, Finance, chemicals, electronics, planes engines, ect). Working for them will do wonders for your career.

#27 dmaul1114   Banned Banned   24688 Posts   Joined 15.5 Years Ago  

dmaul1114

Posted 20 January 2011 - 07:22 PM

The distance thing shouldn't be much of a concern given he's just now leaving college. So he's not tied to a house or anything, which makes it a lot more easier to search for jobs all over the place.

Otherwise, only advice is to apply for a ton of positions and don't get discouraged if it takes a while to find something as the job market is still very tough currently and you'll be at a disadvantage coming fresh out of college as you'll be up against lots of people with years of experience on top of their degrees.

#28

Guest_strongpimphand_*

Posted 20 January 2011 - 07:26 PM

OH YEA, ONE MORE THING....

EMBELLISH YOUR ASS OFF!!!

Make 'em learn the truth while during the interview. Or, keep 'em in the dark even still. Don't lie, because liars get caught.

But if you helped coach a little league team....throw that in the activities section of your resume or in the cover letter. Are you active in your church? Ask your pastor/event planner person if you can have a fake title and throw it on your resume.

Might as well...I had coordinator and manager all over my final resume in so many words.

These companies wanna not hire ya....so you gotta take the gloves off

#29 Soodmeg  

Posted 20 January 2011 - 07:40 PM

By lying? That seems like the plot of a shitty UPN tv show. That is the worst advice ever.


Dont, lie at all, you dont have to tell them you are a kid out of college but dont dibliberity lie to anyone. If you get caught once, your reputation will be completely over in that section. Plus any real vet in your field would be able to tell you are bullshitting.

Trust me, I work in TV/Film and Broadcast production every day there is another overnight actor or director lying their ass of pretending to be something they are not. The sad thing is some of these guys I wouldnt even mind giving a shot but when you start of lying how can I trust you to get any of the job done.

Again, just remember that looking for a full time gig is a full time gig. You should set aside 4 or 5 hours a day looking for one. Contacting people, sending out resumes, calling people.

Just work your ass off and hope that something falls your way.

#30 Clak   Made of star stuff. CAGiversary!   8079 Posts   Joined 11.3 Years Ago  

Posted 20 January 2011 - 08:42 PM

He isn't talking about lying, it's all in the wording. When I write things I usually get right to the point without really caring if I could describe something in another way. When writing a resume you ahve to give thought to how you're describing yourself. It isn't lying so much as it is choosing your words carefully. You may not really feel like you were a manager, but did you manage people at some point? If yes, put that down as management experience, even if it wasn't as big a deal as it may sound.