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Quitting shortly after getting hired from temp-to-perm?


#1 DisGonnaBeGood   But I need tacos! I need them or I will explode. CAGiversary!   3624 Posts   Joined 10.3 Years Ago  

DisGonnaBeGood

Posted 17 January 2016 - 06:02 AM

I have been temping for the past few months and was just recently hired on full time. I have been kicking around the idea of quitting, but now that I have been hired on full time I feel like it would leave a sour taste in their mouth if I were to quit so soon. If I'm not mistaken, employers have to pay the temp agency a fee to release the employee (a couple thousand dollars from what I've read elsewhere). Besides that, I was just informed I would have to take a training module within the next couple weeks that would cost the company a couple hundred dollars. I speculate they've pumped a fair amount of money into employing me and training me, so I almost feel obligated to stay with them.

 

Working conditions are tolerable for the most part, but a couple of things sit in the back of my mind and nag at me; too much down time, low wage, unsupportive boss, and a few other things.

 

Obviously I would try and find other employment first, but me quitting is inevitable. If not within the next couple weeks, definitely within the next few months.



#2 SchmidtA99   CAGiversary! CAGiversary!   509 Posts   Joined 14.8 Years Ago  

Posted 17 January 2016 - 08:17 AM

I wouldn't just quit. I'd give 2 weeks notice at the very least. Better to not burn the bridges.



#3 Chadt74   CAGoholic CAGiversary!   304 Posts   Joined 13.1 Years Ago  

Posted 17 January 2016 - 06:16 PM

If you are not happy you should not work there, not sure what else to say.  As for when/how to leave as the previous poster noted you should probably have your next job secured and then the maximum amount of notice 2 weeks minimum.  Just an FYI I have used temp agencies in the past and hired temps to perms.

 

To answer your questions about Temp-to-Perm Cost

 

"employers have to pay the temp agency a fee to release the employee (a couple thousand dollars from what I've read elsewhere)." This is highly negotiable between the temp agency and company that hired you.  Also the fee can depend on how long you temped.  The fee can be as high as 1/3 of your annual salary but at my company if the temp works for so many hours (something like 4 months worth) there is ZERO fee to hire an employee; you probably will not find out the actual cost.

 

Training courses are the same, the more the company sends the less they pay.  One small thing to consider, if this company is in an industry you want to stay in you might consider staying longer.

 

Either way you are going to leave a sour taste in their mouth, but having a disgruntle employee does not help the company either.  I would stick it out a bit longer, look for your next job and then do the right thing once you secure employment and give as much notice as possible.

 

Good luck.



#4 DisGonnaBeGood   But I need tacos! I need them or I will explode. CAGiversary!   3624 Posts   Joined 10.3 Years Ago  

DisGonnaBeGood

Posted 17 January 2016 - 09:48 PM



I wouldn't just quit. I'd give 2 weeks notice at the very least. Better to not burn the bridges.

 

When the time comes, I'll make sure to give 2 weeks notice.

 



If you are not happy you should not work there, not sure what else to say.  As for when/how to leave as the previous poster noted you should probably have your next job secured and then the maximum amount of notice 2 weeks minimum.  Just an FYI I have used temp agencies in the past and hired temps to perms.

 

To answer your questions about Temp-to-Perm Cost

 

"employers have to pay the temp agency a fee to release the employee (a couple thousand dollars from what I've read elsewhere)." This is highly negotiable between the temp agency and company that hired you.  Also the fee can depend on how long you temped.  The fee can be as high as 1/3 of your annual salary but at my company if the temp works for so many hours (something like 4 months worth) there is ZERO fee to hire an employee; you probably will not find out the actual cost.

 

Training courses are the same, the more the company sends the less they pay.  One small thing to consider, if this company is in an industry you want to stay in you might consider staying longer.

 

Either way you are going to leave a sour taste in their mouth, but having a disgruntle employee does not help the company either.  I would stick it out a bit longer, look for your next job and then do the right thing once you secure employment and give as much notice as possible.

 

Good luck.

 

That's pretty much what I have come to the conclusion of - if I'm not happy, I really shouldn't be working there. However I will wait until I've secured something else before giving my two weeks notice.

 

Only reason I mentioned the fee the company could potentially be paying the temp agency is because I wouldn't want my employer to pay that fee and then I go and say "I hate to break it to you, but unfortunately I have to give my two weeks notice as I found other employment". I have been there for 90 days though, so I don't think it's just mere coincidence they're hiring me on temp to perm out of nowhere. Would guess my employer isn't paying a fee either. Again I am only concerned about the whole fee thing because it only adds to my guilt in regards to quitting.

 

I guess what's done is done, and I shouldn't worry about things that should be of little concern to me. Will attempt to leave a good impression before I quit, so it won't all be for nothing (especially since I've only been putting up with the job because it relates to my degree and it would look good on my resume).



#5 Vampire_Zio   Death Lord CAGiversary!   606 Posts   Joined 10.6 Years Ago  

Posted 04 February 2016 - 06:25 AM

What line of work are ya in?



#6 needler420   car title is lost CAGiversary!   2492 Posts   Joined 9.2 Years Ago  

Posted 09 February 2016 - 08:49 PM

The fee has nothing to do with you. You sound extremely naive and easily taken advantage of.

You been with the company 90 days you shouldn't even care if they go out of business as you don't even like working there.

#7 msjs91011  

Posted 24 December 2016 - 09:04 PM

A job will never feel like work if you're happy. Clearly you're not happy for the reasons stated and if that's true then you need to do some soul searching to decide what kind of work you can see yourself doing long term. Do it the right way. Do your job searching while performing to expectations at your current job and communicate with the new company hiring you that you need to provide your current employer with 2 weeks notice and they WILL give it to you. If you do things the right way when transitioning jobs you won't have to worry about that potential employer verifying your current employment just for them to tell the potential employer that you quit without notice which is one of the worst things you can do.

Edit: holy crap I wasn't paying attention to dates (using Tapatalk so I was scrolling kinda quick) and accidentally necroed a dead thread. My bad.

:facepalm:
- compliments of the confines of my mind's sphincter

#8 MichaelAcure  

MichaelAcure

Posted 31 July 2019 - 04:42 AM

125 for divulging extremely personal information that will haunt you the rest of your life.

What a crock. They shouldve been shut down and those responsible for the negligence put in jail.

#9 Imogenewap  

Imogenewap

Posted 22 October 2019 - 04:19 PM

Hi

My suggestion would be to get a good Thai lawyer to check it out for you. It so much better to be safe than sorry. If you dont know anyone, then I am happy to recommend one I have used many times before. Just send me an e-mail. No problem Mr Chang.