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Nintendo Labo


#1 Richard Kain   The Kaiser CAGiversary!   2644 Posts   Joined 11.6 Years Ago  

Richard Kain

Posted 17 January 2018 - 10:40 PM

In the quasi-stealth Nintendo Direct that they put out today, Nintendo announced a new line of hobby-game things they are releasing this year called "Labo." Essentially, it is going to be a series of construction sets made from corrugated cardboard with designs perforated into them. Apparently, instructions for constructing these things will be available as interactive guides on the Switch itself. Once constructed, the Switch will slot into them in various ways, while the Joycons and their motion/vibration sensors will allow for limited interactions.

 

I imagine most hard-core gaming enthusiasts are going to turn their noses up at this particular initiative. It is definitely not in keeping with what the "hard-core" demographic is generally into.

 

At the same time, from both a business and marketing standpoint, this is pure genius. An arts-and-crafts initiative is a really easy sell for parents. Look at this! You can get your kids into arts-and-crafts and focused construction with a fun digital toy! And this sort of thing is also the kind of product that will look really good on day-time talkshows and mass-media outlets. It makes for a great pitch.

 

From a business perspective, it is a very low-cost, low-risk venture that could easily translate into a lot of money. The actual production for these things is going to be extremely low. It's just a matter of printing and perforating sheets of cardboard. All of the actual construction is done by the end-user. That cuts out a huge amount of expense in manufacturing. It is also a better way to appeal to retailers. Flat sheets of cardboard in a box are going to take up a lot less space on shelves as opposed to pre-assembled plastic accessories. And accessories made out of recyclable cardboard are going to let Nintendo brag about how much more environmentally-friendly they are being. (no mountains of plastic accessories clogging up landfills)

 

I don't expect this thing to be "the future" of videogames. But as a clever diversion with potential long-term sustainability, it's actually pretty great. The cost per-unit is low enough that they can continue coming up with new, different versions indefinitely. Almost no risk, and way less up-front investment in terms of production and stock.



#2 1mhot3K   DealHunter CAGiversary!   314 Posts   Joined 2.1 Years Ago  

Posted 20 January 2018 - 06:01 PM

I LIKE THAT NINTENDO IS ALWAYS LOOKING FOR A WAY TO PUSH THE MEDIUM FOREWARD. The success of the Wii was due to this innovation but also came at quick adoptions from casual players, but low software purchases after the novelty of if wears off. The Wii U suffer from piss poor promotion. Luckily the Switch took 2017 by storm and this new idea is going to hopefully allow for the younger gamers to enjoy.

My only concern is that the idea of buying cardboard boxes for $60-$80 is questionable, the durability of these devices is also iffy. I think it will sell like crazy but it does seem a tinge gimmicky. Hopefully they will still keep up the steady stream of ports and quality first party titles.

#3 chrislisting   CAGiversary! Banned   1557 Posts   Joined 8.9 Years Ago  

chrislisting

Posted 22 January 2018 - 05:10 PM

Absolutely incredible
I must say, without understatement , this truly is pushing the envelope .....it’s pushing the whole damn filing cabinet, like ^ the medium

Forget that stupid VR crap, I assure you, it’ll last a year longer than 3D at best....which isn’t happening

THIS....this is what next gen is about, thinking so far outside the box that you actually origami the shit outta the box and use it !

I really don’t know what else to say (especially without a demo) except THIS is why I dropped “next gen” ps4 (which my wife gladly grabbed) and went with the TRUE state of the art/future gen

#4 chrislisting   CAGiversary! Banned   1557 Posts   Joined 8.9 Years Ago  

chrislisting

Posted 22 January 2018 - 05:18 PM

In the quasi-stealth Nintendo Direct that they put out today, Nintendo announced a new line of hobby-game things they are releasing this year called "Labo." Essentially, it is going to be a series of construction sets made from corrugated cardboard with designs perforated into them. Apparently, instructions for constructing these things will be available as interactive guides on the Switch itself. Once constructed, the Switch will slot into them in various ways, while the Joycons and their motion/vibration sensors will allow for limited interactions.
 
I imagine most hard-core gaming enthusiasts are going to turn their noses up at this particular initiative. It is definitely not in keeping with what the "hard-core" demographic is generally into.
 
At the same time, from both a business and marketing standpoint, this is pure genius. An arts-and-crafts initiative is a really easy sell for parents. Look at this! You can get your kids into arts-and-crafts and focused construction with a fun digital toy! And this sort of thing is also the kind of product that will look really good on day-time talkshows and mass-media outlets. It makes for a great pitch.
 
From a business perspective, it is a very low-cost, low-risk venture that could easily translate into a lot of money. The actual production for these things is going to be extremely low. It's just a matter of printing and perforating sheets of cardboard. All of the actual construction is done by the end-user. That cuts out a huge amount of expense in manufacturing. It is also a better way to appeal to retailers. Flat sheets of cardboard in a box are going to take up a lot less space on shelves as opposed to pre-assembled plastic accessories. And accessories made out of recyclable cardboard are going to let Nintendo brag about how much more environmentally-friendly they are being. (no mountains of plastic accessories clogging up landfills)
 
I don't expect this thing to be "the future" of videogames. But as a clever diversion with potential long-term sustainability, it's actually pretty great. The cost per-unit is low enough that they can continue coming up with new, different versions indefinitely. Almost no risk, and way less up-front investment in terms of production and stock.


Rich, you know I’m a huge fan of your posts .....however, that sentiment in your closing statement is too careful my friend. You and I both know Better... when does a Nintendo venture ever end in the stagnant death of an idea? Good concepts are always EITHER recycled or reincorporated/reintegrated in some other fashion . Nintendo always , or rather, never had a bad idea.....hell they were doing VR in. 1995

One point of minor contention is, perhaps, in our view of the potential.? Like if let’s call “4K next gen” which refers to ps4( and subsequently the xbx1x or whatever it is) is pushing VR and the Labo is the accessory add on response....imagine what this will give birth to.....

We’re looking at a console that can adapt to any situation with a peripheral that can adapt to any game ......and it’s a prototype, just imagine.....the possibilities

(And VR not only has BEEN around for over 20 years, it’s still shitty, so you can use anything over 720p, it’s all the same shit)