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Hurricane Sandy - new weaker storm to hamper recovery possible next week


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#31 slidecage

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Posted 27 October 2012 - 10:53 PM

wont happen but say it would of ..

if it hit new york city head on would it flooded out all of the subways or is there a way to protect them from something like this
WOOOO I STINK

#32 mitch079

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 12:12 AM

wont happen but say it would of ..

if it hit new york city head on would it flooded out all of the subways or is there a way to protect them from something like this


They would shut down the Subways and other Mass Transit. They're talking about doing it anyway at 7PM Sunday.

http://transportatio...own-nyc-subway/

http://transportatio...ystem-shutdown/

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#33 slidecage

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 12:39 AM

They would shut down the Subways and other Mass Transit. They're talking about doing it anyway at 7PM Sunday.

http://transportatio...own-nyc-subway/

http://transportatio...ystem-shutdown/


i mean they would be down for days or months since how would they get the water out of them,,,, and a major cold front came in and froze all of that water ...


that would be one freaking mess
WOOOO I STINK

#34 Blaster man

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 01:07 AM

And this is why I prefer the Capital Weather Gang. As I said earlier, I've used them in the past and NEVER had problems with them exaggerating to get viewers/clicks. They said that WV and western VA can get up to a foot of snow.

Now look at ABC...
http://abcnews.go.co...28#.UIyFBIY4fPo

The storm will affect the eastern third of the country -- not just the coast -- and include inland flooding around Maryland and Pennsylvania and up to two feet of snow in West Virginia, said Louis Uccellini, director of the National Centers for Environmental Prediction. Normal weathercasters will throw out the most extreme possibility no matter how unlikely.

#35 TheHumanSpider

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 02:40 AM

They always say it's going to be big and bla bla but it never is for me. I'm in central jersey. Not even worrying about it at all. Hope the rest of you guys aren't going to get too screwed. Be safe, people.


I'm from Central Jersey too, it was hilarious last time when the last hurricane came and everybody was freaking out at my local Costco and were buying power generators left and right, after the storm passed Costco got an influx of people returning said (unopened) power generators.

#36 aronater

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 02:54 AM

East Coast CAG's: stay safe! (especially the NJ CAG's) ;) By the way what games will you guys be playing as you wait out the storm?

#37 TheHumanSpider

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 03:19 AM

East Coast CAG's: stay safe! (especially the NJ CAG's) ;) By the way what games will you guys be playing as you wait out the storm?


Awesome deal on BioShock 1 + 2 on Amazon right now...probably those :P

#38 Blaster man

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 03:29 AM

East Coast CAG's: stay safe! (especially the NJ CAG's) ;) By the way what games will you guys be playing as you wait out the storm?

Metro 2033


http://www.washingto....html#pagebreak

Posted at 11:09 PM ET, 10/27/2012 Hurricane Sandy: Raging winds and high water to leave mark on Mid-Atlantic



By Jason Samenow
Sandy’s approach to the Mid-Atlantic region this evening is palpable. Its sprawling cloud shield has overspread the region and winds are already gusting over 30 mph at the Maryland and Delaware beaches.
At 11 p.m., Sandy was 360 miles east southeast of Charleston, South Carolina with sustained winds of 75 mph. The central pressure was down to 960 mb.
Reading through blogs and recent statements from the National Weather Service, I’m presently most impressed by two things:
1) Sandy’s incredible size and its associated wind field
2) The amount of water it’s going to push ashore at the beaches
Sandy’s size and associated wind
Meteorologist Angela Fritz of wunderground notes Sandy is now tied for the second largest tropical cyclone since 1988.
“Sandy’s tropical storm-force winds now extend 450 nautical miles from the center on the northeast side of the hurricane,” Fritz writes. “This is a very, very large storm, and I suspect the #1 spot (Olga of 2001) is in jeopardy, as well.”
Evidence of the storm’s unusual size? It’s more than 300 miles east of South Carolina, and in eastern North Carolina, the National Weather Service has logged its first reports of downed trees.
I’m not the only one impressed by how big this storm is and how far from its center it’s generating hazardous winds. Writes our local National Weather Service office:
...CANNOT RECALL EVER SEEING MODEL FORECASTS OF SUCH AN EXPANSIVE AREAL WIND FIELD WITH VALUES SO HIGH FOR SO LONG A TIME. WE ARE BREAKING NEW GROUND HERE.
Reminder: a high wind watch covers the region Sunday night through Tuesday, for sustained winds of 35-45 mph and gusts to 60 mph.
Water at the Maryland and Delaware Beaches, the Chesapeake Bay and Tidal Potomac
The water is rising in Ocean City, Maryland, where levels are already 1.5 feet above average. Water levels are forecast to reach as much as 4 feet above normal by Monday with wave heights of 8 to 14 feet. Says the National Weather Service:
SEVERE FLOODING IS EXPECTED WITHIN A FEW HOURS EITHER SIDE OF HIGH TIDE MONDAY MORNING. . . . WATER LEVELS FROM CHINCOTEAGUE TO OCEAN CITY COULD RIVAL THOSE REACHED IN GLORIA IN 1985.
A similar situation is forecast for the Delaware beaches where coastal flood warnings and high surf warnings are also in effect. Assuming the storm moves north of the Maryland and Delaware beaches, winds will become offshore, ending the coastal flood risk Monday night into Tuesday.
The situation is not as serious for the western shores of the Chesapeake Bay and the Tidal Potomac. Some minor flooding is possible into Monday, with levels around 1 foot above normal. By Tuesday, some moderate flooding could occur, with levels up to 1.5 to 3 feet above normal and a coastal flood watch is in effect. By comparison, levels were up to 9 feet above normal during Isabel.






http://www.nhc.noaa....ind120#contents
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http://www.hpc.ncep....hltimages.shtml

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#39 mr_burnzz

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 03:32 AM

East Coast CAG's: stay safe! (especially the NJ CAG's) ;) By the way what games will you guys be playing as you wait out the storm?


I've been replaying valkyria chronicles. For those that have played it, you know how much time this game requires! Frustrating game though..

#40 Blaster man

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 03:36 AM

I've been replaying valkyria chronicles. For those that have played it, you know how much time this game requires! Frustrating game though..


I thought that game was supposed to be good? I still haven't bought it...

#41 Blaster man

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 11:22 AM

Today (Sunday): Breezy showers are possible today. It’s probably wetter east of I-95 than west. Heavier rain likely moves into the Eastern Shore during the afternoon. Winds from the north increase to near 15-20 mph with gusts around 25-30 mph. Those cool winds and cloudy skies keep temperatures cooler than we’ve seen lately with highs only near 60. Confidence: Medium-High

Tonight: Steadier rain becomes likely overnight and should get heavier toward morning. Winds from the north pick up in strength as well, as gusts may reach 30-35 mph with sustained winds near 15-25 mph. Those north winds put a chill in the air, with overnight lows in the upper 40s to low 50s. Confidence: Medium

Tomorrow (Monday): The center of the storm is still well out to sea, but out ahead of it, our weather takes a marked turn for the worse. Periods of heavy rain are expected throughout the day and winds continue to increase. During the morning, sustained winds increase to 25-30 mph with gusts near 45 mph, and during the afternoon they step up to 35-40 mph sustained with gusts near 60 mph. Widespread power outages could begin to occur, especially later in the day, as winds topple trees in the rain-soaked ground. And severe flooding is expected at the Maryland and Delaware beaches. Temperatures through the day are raw and cool, mainly near 50 to the low 50s under overcast skies. Confidence: Medium


Tomorrow night: Bouts of heavy rain and high winds continue overnight as the center of Sandy approaches the New Jersey coastline. Winds may increase even more, to 35-50 mph sustained with gusts up to around 65 mph. Low-lying areas and areas with poor drainage may begin to see significant flooding. Don’t plan to travel unless it’s an emergency due to the risk of flooding and falling trees and limbs. Rainfall accumulations of 2-4”+ are likely by morning. Confidence: Medium


As Tuesday dawns, the center of the storm is forecast to be inland, just to the north of our area. That keeps us in the zone for more steady rain and driving winds. Accumulating snow will likely be falling in the mountains of West Virginia and Western Maryland as well. Some flakes may even be seen in the far west and northwest suburbs, for example in Loudoun and Frederick counties especially at elevations above 1,000 feet, but no accumulation is expected. Highs probably don’t make it out of the 40s as cold air continues to wrap into the storm. Another 1-2”+ of rain is possible and winds stay strong, from the northwest at 25-35 mph, gusting to 50 mph. Confidence:Medium


The storm should slowly begin to weaken Tuesday night, but that doesn’t mean to let your guard down. Brief periods of heavy rain are still possible but should become more intermittent. Winds remain high with gusts of 35-45 mph still possible. Confidence: Low-Medium


The storm should slowly begin to weaken Tuesday night, but that doesn’t mean to let your guard down. Brief periods of heavy rain are still possible but should become more intermittent. Winds remain high with gusts of 35-45 mph still possible. Confidence: Low-Medium


http://www.nhc.noaa....?large#contents

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#42 Javery

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 11:55 AM

Everyone is freaking out (as always) - except I'm willing to bet the town doesn't cancel my daughter's soccer game today. They play through anything! I may go to the food store but I would be going anyway. Not sure what else I can do to get ready but I'm not convinced that this is going to be some crazy storm other than the fact that it might rain for 5 days straight.

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#43 mr_burnzz

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 12:48 PM

I thought that game was supposed to be good? I still haven't bought it...


The game is wonderful but kinda difficult in some areas. And sometimes one of your team members dies and I can't have that! I have to replay the level which could take an hour. Sometimes even longer. That's the frustrating part.

#44 Blaster man

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 01:04 PM

Everyone is freaking out (as always) - except I'm willing to bet the town doesn't cancel my daughter's soccer game today. They play through anything! I may go to the food store but I would be going anyway. Not sure what else I can do to get ready but I'm not convinced that this is going to be some crazy storm other than the fact that it might rain for 5 days straight.


Well, GL with the store. I'm sure it's going to be insane today. I went on Friday. As far as the storm, I think the wind is supposed to be the worst. I don't know where you live but a few months ago we had a massive storm that blew through the east coast rather quickly but resulted in some folks not having power for a week or longer. This will probably be at least that bad.

The game is wonderful but kinda difficult in some areas. And sometimes one of your team members dies and I can't have that! I have to replay the level which could take an hour. Sometimes even longer. That's the frustrating part.

I've been waiting for a few years now for the game to drop to $10. Maybe this holiday season will finally be the time. I bought Dead Space 2 on Kmart clearance (limited edition with Extraction included) for 9.97 last night.

#45 Blaster man

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 04:13 PM

http://www.washingto....html#pagebreak

Wind
This image shows projected wind speeds (from the GFS model) at an altitude of about 3,000 feet at 8 p.m. Monday night in knots. Notice they are near 90 knots over Washington, D.C. and Baltimore, and over 60 knots over the entire megalopolis from D.C. to Boston. Thankfully, winds at 3,000 feet translate to lesser values at the surface (where we live) - probably by about 25 percent. But - assuming this model is in the ball park - winds across the entire northeast I-95 corridor may well be gusting to 45-70 knots Monday evening, or 50-80 mph!


Posted Image
(WeatherBell.com)

What would winds of 50-80 mph up and down the East Coast mean in terms of power outages? Researchers at Johns Hopkins University have developed a model for that:


Seth Guikema (pronounced Guy-keh-ma) and his team have developed a computer model built on outage data from 11 hurricanes to estimate the fraction of customers who will lose power, based on expected gust wind speed, expected duration of strong winds greater than 20 meters per second, and population density.




They find, conservatively, 10 million customers along the Eastern seaboard will lose power from Sandy. The image below indicates where outages are projected to be most highly concentrated.


Rain
Sandy is predicted to drop a ton of water: from 4-8” in the Washington, D.C. area to 5-10” over the Delmarva peninsula.

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How historic would the amount of rain forecast be? Weather Decisions Technology (WDT) has prepared an analysis shown below. Its model projects Sandy to be a 500-to-1,000 year precipation event for some parts of the Mid-Atlantic with a 100-250 year precipitation event for broader areas mainly over the Delmarva peninsula. In the immediate Washington, D.C. area, it suggests a 1-10 year type event.



I would caution that the exact areas where the heaviest rain will fall is very difficult to predict. So while this map gives an idea of the historic potential of this event, the most extreme values will probably not coincide exactly where modeled here.


Storm Surge
There is the possibility of a devastating 6-11 foot storm surge in Long Island Sound, Raritan Bay and New York Harbor. Low-lying areas of New York City (where evacuation orders have been issued) are likely to be flooded, and possibly parts of the subway system. Farther south, the storm surge will gradually decrease but major to severe coastal flooding is anticipated from the Mid-Atlantic on northward. This map shows a projection.

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Mountain snow
Several feet of snow are possible at high elevations in West Virginia, which would be record-breaking for this time of year. The map below shows one projection for snow totals from the NAM model. Couple these snow amounts with winds which may gust over 50 mph, and power outages are very likely in mountainous West Virginia. Heavy snow may fall in the mountains of southwest Virginia and western North Carolina as well.


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http://www.nhc.noaa....?large#contents



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http://www.nhc.noaa....ind120#contents Posted Image

#46 Pookymeister

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 04:30 PM

Just brought in all the deck furniture - that was a pain in the ass.


#47 mykevermin

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 04:37 PM

Just brought in all the deck furniture - that was a pain in the ass.


Ha! I did that yesterday AM, but our deck is on the third floor and we live in a row home, so yeah - super pain in the ass.
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#48 Blaster man

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 04:59 PM

Ha! I did that yesterday AM, but our deck is on the third floor and we live in a row home, so yeah - super pain in the ass.


I brought my stuff in yesterday too though I left the heavy tempered glass table out there. I think it weighs enough...at least I hope so. I guess if I start to see it moving around, I'll run out and bring it in. I'm not about to bring in the propane tanks...

I think tonight I'll turn the heat up more than normal then tomorrow when I'm awake, I'll turn it up pretty warm so when the power goes out it will stay warm longer. Also thinking about putting the fridge and freezer on colder settings.

Oh, and I notice that the birds are starting to act strangely. They all seem to be out looking for food and moving around erratically.

#49 Stoneage

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 05:28 PM

Just chilling out in the Chicago suburbs reading about all of your impending weather follies. Hope you all stay safe. Also, is it ok to hoard video games if afterwards you put them in the freezer?
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#50 greydt

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 06:03 PM

i mean they would be down for days or months since how would they get the water out of them,,,, and a major cold front came in and froze all of that water ...


that would be one freaking mess



Thanks for the concern! However, train stoppages have been kinda rare here. In the last decade or so, I think the only ones that stood out were: 9/11 (few days), the power outage (few days), a really heavy rain that caused some flooding throughout the city (1-2 days), the transit strike (a week?).

Perhaps another New Yorker can remember others, but those stood out for me. All in all, when it comes down to it, the service does keep chugging along (despite daily annoyances...curse you "broken signal" and "sick passenger"! okay, the latter one kinda makes me a bad person... :P)

#51 Javery

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 06:21 PM

Schools are cancelled. I'm hoping I can "work" from home tomorrow too.

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#52 Number83

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 06:50 PM

Just getting ready to leave for my sons football game...they play through anything but lightning. I'll have to check and see if school is closed. Ill be going to work if that is the case.

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#53 GamerDude316

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 07:09 PM

I live in southwest NH, they're saying we're likely to lose power here. Got extra supplies yesterday and if we are without power for a few days me and my parents will be alright thanks to our work's facilities too. Crossing fingers for all of us East Coasters!

#54 Blaster man

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 08:13 PM

Play by play predictions for DC.

http://www.washingto....html#pagebreak

6 p.m. Sunday to midnight: Rain showers becoming likely, steadiest east of I-95. Winds 20-30 mph (from the north), gusts to 35 mph. Temps 50-55.


12 a.m. Monday to 6:00 am.: Rain showers likely, heavy east of I-95. Winds 25-35 mph (from the north), gusts to 40 mph. Temps 48-53.


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CWG forecast: Peak sustained winds and gusts 6 a.m. Monday to noon: Rain showers likely, becoming heavy, especially east of I-95. Winds 30-40 mph (from the north), gusts to 45 mph. Temps 49-53.


Noon Monday to 6 p.m.: Heavy rain. Winds 35-45 mph (from the north), gusts to 50-60 mph. Temps 47-51.



6 p.m. Monday to midnight: Heavy rain. Winds 35-50 mph (from the north), gusts 50-70 mph. Turning cold, temps 42-47.



Midnight Tuesday to 6 a.m.: Heavy rain. Winds 30-40 mph (from the northwest), gusts 40-60 mph. Cold, temps 37-42. (Outside chance snowflakes western Loudoun and Frederick counties)


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CWG forecast: Rainfall totals 6 a.m. Tuesday to noon: Rain. Winds 25-35 mph (from the southwest), gusts 35-50 mph. Temps 39-44.


Noon Tuesday to 6 p.m.: Showery. Winds 25-35 mph (from the southwest), gusts 35-45 mph. Temps 43-47.


6 p.m. Tuesday to midnight: Showers diminishing. Winds 20-30 mph (from the southwest), gusts 30-40 mph.

#55 HaloTrial1

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 08:41 PM

Well, schools canceled monday and tuesday for me so.....yay :D

#56 benjamouth

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 09:04 PM

Works closed, so I'll be working from home tomorrow, assuming I have power.

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#57 Predator Ranger

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Posted 28 October 2012 - 11:38 PM

My mother has called me six times today freaking out about the storm. We live outside of fucking Albany, and she doesn't leave her apartment, I cannot stress enough to her how little she has to worry about. I really wish she would stop letting news channel hyperbole get her so worked up.
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#58 Blaster man

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 12:56 AM

http://www.washingto....html#pagebreak

As Hurricane Sandy draws closer (it’s now about 250-300 miles east of the Carolinas), forecasts for its effects have grown more hazardous for the Washington, D.C. metro region.


In its update to the High Wind Warning this evening, the National Weather Service increased its estimate for peak wind gusts from 60 to 70 mph. It also increased its projected rainfall for the region to 5 to 10 inches from 4-8 inches in its update to the Flood Watch.



Here are a set of important statements from the latest National Weather Service statements and discussions:


* A PROLONGED PERIOD OF POWERFUL AND DANGEROUS WINDS IS EXPECTED...LASTING LIKELY WELL INTO TUESDAY BEFORE GRADUALLY SUBSIDING..


* RESIDENTS...VISITORS... AND BUSINESSES ACROSS THE REGION SHOULD PLAN FOR WIDESPREAD POWER AND COMMUNICATION OUTAGES.


* IF THE FORECAST RAINFALL AMOUNTS ARE OBSERVED ON A WIDESPREAD BASIS...WIDESPREAD MAJOR FLOODING IS POSSIBLE.


* THIS IS A VERY DANGEROUS STORM WHICH WILL AFFECT THE ENTIRE AREA REGARDLESS OF WHERE THE STORM CENTER IS.


* PLEASE TAKE THIS THREAT VERY SERIOUSLY...THIS IS GOING TO CREATE SIGNIFICANT DISRUPTIONS OVER THE NEXT COUPLE DAYS. BE PREPARED TO AT LEAST HUNKER DOWN FOR A WHILE...AND BE PREPARED FOR SOME SERIOUSLY CHALLENGING CONDITIONS.


I’d like to stress that beyond a certain time Monday, it will probably become unsafe to be outside, either walking or driving. In the morning hours, you may be able to get around OK, but with wind-driven rain, it will be unpleasant.



I’d like to stress that beyond a certain time Monday, it will probably become unsafe to be outside, either walking or driving. In the morning hours, you may be able to get around OK, but with wind-driven rain, it will be unpleasant.

#59 WV Matsui

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 01:14 AM

Stuck in Orland with my wife and 14 month old daughter stuck at home in WV :-( such a shitty feeling...

#60 Blaster man

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Posted 29 October 2012 - 03:25 AM

Projected path has changed. Instead of coming ashore in central Jersey, it's now targeted at south Jersey/DE.

http://www.nhc.noaa....?large#contents

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In case I didn't mention this already, the hurricane is hitting at high tide so there's going to be massive flooding on the coast.

http://www.huffingto..._n_2035671.html

KENSINGTON, Md. (AP) -- The projected storm surge from Hurricane Sandy is a "worst case scenario" with devastating waves and tides predicted for the highly populated New York City metro area, government forecasters said Sunday.


The more they observe it, the more the experts worry about the water – which usually kills and does more damage than winds in hurricanes.


In this case, seas will be amped up by giant waves and full-moon-powered high tides. That will combine with drenching rains, triggering inland flooding as the hurricane merges with a winter storm system that will worsen it and hold it in place for days.


Louis Uccellini, environmental prediction chief for the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, told The Associated Press that given Sandy's due east-to-west track into New Jersey, that puts the worst of the storm surge just north in New York City, Long Island and northern New Jersey. "Yes, this is the worst case scenario," he said.


In a measurement of pure kinetic energy, NOAA's hurricane research division on Sunday ranked the surge and wave "destruction potential" for Sandy – just the hurricane, not the hybrid storm it will eventually become – at 5.8 on a 0 to 6 scale. The damage expected from winds will be far less, experts said. Weather Underground meteorologist Jeff Masters says that surge destruction potential number is a record and it's due to the storm's massive size.


"You have a lot of wind acting over a long distance of water for hundreds of miles" and that piles the storm surge up when it finally comes ashore, Masters said. Even though it doesn't pack much power in maximum wind speed, the tremendous size of Sandy – more than 1,000 miles across with tropical storm force winds – adds to the pummelling power when it comes ashore, he said.


The storm surge energy numbers are bigger than the deadly 2005 Hurricane Katrina, but that can be misleading. Katrina's destruction was concentrated in a small area, making it much worse, Masters said. Sandy's storm surge energy is spread over a wider area. Also, Katrina hit a city that is below sea level and had problems with levees.


National Hurricane Center Director Rick Knabb said Hurricane Sandy's size means some coastal parts of New York and New Jersey may see water rise from 6 to 11 feet from surge and waves. The rest of the coast north of Virginia can expect 4 to 8 feet of surge.


The full moon Monday will add 2 to 3 inches to the storm surge in New York, Masters said.


"If the forecasts hold true in terms of the amount of rainfall and the amount of coastal flooding, that's going to be what drives up the losses and that's what's going to hurt," said Susan Cutter, director of the hazards and vulnerability research institute at the University of South Carolina.


Cutter said she worries about coastal infrastructure, especially the New York subways, which were shutting down Sunday night.


Klaus Jacob, a Columbia University researcher who has advised the city on coastal risks, said, "We have to prepare to the extent we can, but I'm afraid that from a subway point of view, I think it's beyond sheer preparations. I do not think that there's enough emergency measures that will help prevent the subway from flooding."


Knabb said millions of people may be harmed by inland flooding.


A NOAA map of inland and coastal flood watches covers practically the entire Northeast: all of Maryland, New Jersey, Delaware, and Connecticut; most of Pennsylvania, New York, Massachusetts and Vermont, and parts of northeastern Ohio, eastern Virginia, North Carolina, and western New Hampshire.


Along the mid-Atlantic coast, storm surge is already starting to build, Uccellini said. NOAA's Coastal Services Center chief Margaret Davidson said to expect "bodacious impacts" from both surge and inland flooding.


The surge – in which water steadily increases from the ocean_ will be worst in the areas north of where Sandy comes ashore.


New York will have the most intense storm surge if Sandy comes ashore anywhere in New Jersey, Uccellini said. Only if it arrives farther south, such as Delaware, will New York see a slightly, only slightly, smaller storm surge.


In general, areas to the south and west of landfall will get the heaviest of rains. Some areas of Delaware and the Maryland and Virginia peninsula will see a foot of rain over the several days the storm parks in the East, Uccellini said. The rest of the mid-Atlantic region may see closer to 4 to 8 inches, NOAA forecasts.


The good news about inland flooding is that the rivers and ground aren't as saturated as they were last year when Hurricane Irene struck, causing nearly $16 billion in damage, much of it from inland flooding in places like Vermont, Uccellini and Masters said.


The storm, which threatens roughly 50 million in the eastern third of the country, began as three systems. Two of those – an Arctic blast from the north and a normal winter storm front with a low-pressure trough_ have combined. Hurricane Sandy will meld with those once it comes ashore, creating a hybrid storm with some of the nastier characteristics of a hurricane and a nor'easter, experts have said.